Presentation Title

Engineering, Optimization, and Analysis of Single and Double Stack Hydrogen Fuel Cells

Faculty Mentor

Dr. James Murphy

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 67

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

We’ve constructed several hydrogen fuel cells utilizing polymer exchange membranes (PEMs). Platinum coated PEMs catalyze the reaction between hydrogen and oxygen gasses and facilitate the transport of protons between the anode and cathode. The fuel cell design consists of graphite electrodes which allow hydrogen and oxygen gases to contact the PEM. It also conducts electrons away from the anode toward the cathode.

To characterize the performance of a fuel cell we measure the voltage output of the cell as a function of load resistance. This data is used to determine the power output as a function of the current. From this, we determine the maximum power output and optimum load resistance for the cell.

Fuel cells consisting of only one membrane (single stack) and two membranes (double stack) positioned in series were constructed. We’ve optimized single stack fuel cells by systematically varying the pressure at which hydrogen is delivered to the anode, the flow rate of the hydrogen, and design of the hydrogen and oxygen (air) flow channels in both graphite electrodes. To date, we’ve built a single stack cell capable of producing 135 mW at a current of 375 mA.

In addition, a double stack was constructed in series capable of producing 150 mW at 250 mA. Ideally a double stack would produce 270 mW at a current of 375 mA. Evidence shows hydrogen gas is not distributed equally between the two electrodes when hydrogen is distributed in series. In part, this could account for less than optimum performance of the double stack fuel cell.

In an effort to further optimize the performance of the double stack fuel cell we’re constructing a fuel cell which distributes equal amounts of hydrogen to electrodes in parallel. We will present the preliminary results of the parallel hydrogen distribution system.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Engineering, Optimization, and Analysis of Single and Double Stack Hydrogen Fuel Cells

CREVELING 67

We’ve constructed several hydrogen fuel cells utilizing polymer exchange membranes (PEMs). Platinum coated PEMs catalyze the reaction between hydrogen and oxygen gasses and facilitate the transport of protons between the anode and cathode. The fuel cell design consists of graphite electrodes which allow hydrogen and oxygen gases to contact the PEM. It also conducts electrons away from the anode toward the cathode.

To characterize the performance of a fuel cell we measure the voltage output of the cell as a function of load resistance. This data is used to determine the power output as a function of the current. From this, we determine the maximum power output and optimum load resistance for the cell.

Fuel cells consisting of only one membrane (single stack) and two membranes (double stack) positioned in series were constructed. We’ve optimized single stack fuel cells by systematically varying the pressure at which hydrogen is delivered to the anode, the flow rate of the hydrogen, and design of the hydrogen and oxygen (air) flow channels in both graphite electrodes. To date, we’ve built a single stack cell capable of producing 135 mW at a current of 375 mA.

In addition, a double stack was constructed in series capable of producing 150 mW at 250 mA. Ideally a double stack would produce 270 mW at a current of 375 mA. Evidence shows hydrogen gas is not distributed equally between the two electrodes when hydrogen is distributed in series. In part, this could account for less than optimum performance of the double stack fuel cell.

In an effort to further optimize the performance of the double stack fuel cell we’re constructing a fuel cell which distributes equal amounts of hydrogen to electrodes in parallel. We will present the preliminary results of the parallel hydrogen distribution system.