Presentation Title

The Origin of Inverse Frequency Noise

Faculty Mentor

John Bowers

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

CREVELING 69

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

The origin of inverse frequency noise in semiconductors (sometimes referred to as flicker noise) has been long been debated. The impact of flicker noise on a wide range of devices is increasingly important and understanding the origin of flicker noise would have wide impact. Our research hypothesizes that the origin is based on the upset of space charge neutrality, which is exacerbated by the turbulence in the flow of the electrons within devices. We used structures fabricated on SOI wafers, specifically abrupt junction resistors and whistle resistors. These resistors' dimensions were varied with the intent of changing the turbulence within the device. We measured the IV slope of each device, observing the difference in resistance based on the direction of the current flow. As the measured resistance of the device is an indicator for turbulence. We systematically measured differences in current flow and direction as a function of applied voltage. The dependence of noise on structure and current will be shown. Simulations of turbulent flow were made so the spectral characteristics of turbulence could be studied in detail. The results are not yet conclusive.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

The Origin of Inverse Frequency Noise

CREVELING 69

The origin of inverse frequency noise in semiconductors (sometimes referred to as flicker noise) has been long been debated. The impact of flicker noise on a wide range of devices is increasingly important and understanding the origin of flicker noise would have wide impact. Our research hypothesizes that the origin is based on the upset of space charge neutrality, which is exacerbated by the turbulence in the flow of the electrons within devices. We used structures fabricated on SOI wafers, specifically abrupt junction resistors and whistle resistors. These resistors' dimensions were varied with the intent of changing the turbulence within the device. We measured the IV slope of each device, observing the difference in resistance based on the direction of the current flow. As the measured resistance of the device is an indicator for turbulence. We systematically measured differences in current flow and direction as a function of applied voltage. The dependence of noise on structure and current will be shown. Simulations of turbulent flow were made so the spectral characteristics of turbulence could be studied in detail. The results are not yet conclusive.