Presentation Title

Supercontinuum Rapid Excitation-Emission Matrix Detection

Faculty Mentor

Timothy Corcoran PhD

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:15 AM

Location

C323

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Supercontinuum rapid excitation-emission matrix detection (ScREEM) utilizes capillary laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and a flowing sample, such as capillary electrophoresis, to collect excitation-emission matrices (EEM) of multiple fluorescent species simultaneously, rapidly, and accurately. What separates ScREEM from other methods is the fact that a supercontinuum laser produces a wide range of wavelengths that can excite multiple fluorescent species flowing through a miniscule volume at once, allowing for numerous EEMs to be collected per second. The product of the EEM with mathematical filter functions allows for essentially instantaneous quantitation of fluorescence, even when multiple fluorescing species or light scatter are present. In this manner, I was able to determine the average signal of analyte (rhodamine B) at varying concentration as a simple test of system performance. Using linear least squares fitting of this data set gave the standard deviation and slope required to determine the limit of quantitation. The limit of quantitation (LoQ) for rhodamine B was be found 3.7x10−8 M, indicating only 1.4x10−18 moles analyte in the detection volume of 40 picoliters.

Summary of research results to be presented

The limit of quantitation (LoQ) for rhodamine B was 3.7x10-8 M, indicating only 1.4x10-18 moles analyte in the detection volume of 40 picoliters.

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Nov 17th, 9:00 AM Nov 17th, 9:15 AM

Supercontinuum Rapid Excitation-Emission Matrix Detection

C323

Supercontinuum rapid excitation-emission matrix detection (ScREEM) utilizes capillary laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and a flowing sample, such as capillary electrophoresis, to collect excitation-emission matrices (EEM) of multiple fluorescent species simultaneously, rapidly, and accurately. What separates ScREEM from other methods is the fact that a supercontinuum laser produces a wide range of wavelengths that can excite multiple fluorescent species flowing through a miniscule volume at once, allowing for numerous EEMs to be collected per second. The product of the EEM with mathematical filter functions allows for essentially instantaneous quantitation of fluorescence, even when multiple fluorescing species or light scatter are present. In this manner, I was able to determine the average signal of analyte (rhodamine B) at varying concentration as a simple test of system performance. Using linear least squares fitting of this data set gave the standard deviation and slope required to determine the limit of quantitation. The limit of quantitation (LoQ) for rhodamine B was be found 3.7x10−8 M, indicating only 1.4x10−18 moles analyte in the detection volume of 40 picoliters.