Presentation Title

The development of thread-based fuel cells and MoS2 nanoflowers as biosensors

Faculty Mentor

Frank Gomez

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

Location

C335

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Solutions to solving future energy needs and lack of proper healthcare in the world are not mutually exclusive. Recently, novel platforms fabricated from a variety of inexpensive materials (e.g. paper and thread) have been used as energy devices. Similarly, sensors to quantify bioanalytes have utilized materials that are easy to fabricate and have potential in resource-limited settings. There is potential to explore these materials and others that can one day be employed in regions where the need for a reliable source of energy and affordable healthcare are warranted. Herein, we describe a completely fabric-based direct formate fuel cell (DFFC) utilizing fabric-based electrodes. Conventional DFFCs require power consuming external pumping and expensive metal catalysts, greatly reducing their practicality for widespread application. The electrodes were fabricated by coating thread with conductive inks (silver and carbon/graphite ink) and painting activated carbon and palladium/carbon catalyst on the cathode and anode, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) and potassium formate (5 M) were used as the catholyte and anode fuel, respectively. The FC achieved an open circuit voltage of 1V. A non-enzymatic sensor consisting of MoS2 nanoflowers, grown via powder vapor deposition, is described and was shown to electrochemically oxidize glucose. Enzymatic electrochemical sensors are limited in their use due to temperature, pH, humidity, and cost. The nanoflower-based device, on the other hand, is not subject to said issues, thereby, making it a potential option in a fabric-based non-enzymatic detection device. Future work will focus on further maximizing the performance of the FC and designing a reusable nanoflower-based sensing device.

Summary of research results to be presented

The presentation will include polarization curves of the thread based fuel cells. IR and Raman spectroscopy will also be shown to prove the successful deposition of the nanoflowers. Cyclic voltammetry data will also be shown to prove the non-enzymatic oxidation of glucose by the nanoflowers.

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Nov 17th, 9:30 AM Nov 17th, 9:45 AM

The development of thread-based fuel cells and MoS2 nanoflowers as biosensors

C335

Solutions to solving future energy needs and lack of proper healthcare in the world are not mutually exclusive. Recently, novel platforms fabricated from a variety of inexpensive materials (e.g. paper and thread) have been used as energy devices. Similarly, sensors to quantify bioanalytes have utilized materials that are easy to fabricate and have potential in resource-limited settings. There is potential to explore these materials and others that can one day be employed in regions where the need for a reliable source of energy and affordable healthcare are warranted. Herein, we describe a completely fabric-based direct formate fuel cell (DFFC) utilizing fabric-based electrodes. Conventional DFFCs require power consuming external pumping and expensive metal catalysts, greatly reducing their practicality for widespread application. The electrodes were fabricated by coating thread with conductive inks (silver and carbon/graphite ink) and painting activated carbon and palladium/carbon catalyst on the cathode and anode, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) and potassium formate (5 M) were used as the catholyte and anode fuel, respectively. The FC achieved an open circuit voltage of 1V. A non-enzymatic sensor consisting of MoS2 nanoflowers, grown via powder vapor deposition, is described and was shown to electrochemically oxidize glucose. Enzymatic electrochemical sensors are limited in their use due to temperature, pH, humidity, and cost. The nanoflower-based device, on the other hand, is not subject to said issues, thereby, making it a potential option in a fabric-based non-enzymatic detection device. Future work will focus on further maximizing the performance of the FC and designing a reusable nanoflower-based sensing device.