Presentation Title

Seismic and Atmospheric Rise in Hydraulic Fracturing Operations across the United States

Faculty Mentor

Ramesh Singh, Lewis Long

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

Location

C323

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Hydraulic Fracturing operations associated with horizontal drilling for oil/gas production in the US are known to induce earthquakes by wastewater injection. In recent years, numerous studies have shown a close relationship between induced seismic activities to the high-pressure injection of wastewater disposal, especially in Oklahoma, Southern Kansas, and Texas. In this paper, an analysis of sixteen major fracking operation locations across the US has been carried out to study the impact of horizontal wells and injected wastewater on earthquake activities. The seismic activities from the USGS earthquake catalog show an increase in the number of earthquakes within a radius of 150 km at the location of fracking operations in south central US, whereas no changes were observed in other US regions. Detailed earthquake data analysis on magnitude and proximity to fracking sites has shown that operations involved in horizontal drilling enhance seismic activities in the US. The stimulation of earthquakes depends not only on the amount of injected wastewater or horizontal well count, but largely on the geology and geophysical environment of the drilling site. Further, AQUA satellite data show an increasing trend of mole fraction methane concentrations associated with the oil/gas production.

Summary of research results to be presented

Seismic activity over the last two decades (1998-June 2018) shows an increase in induced seismicity in the central US. Earthquake activities may be triggered by high-pressure wastewater reinjection. Induced seismicity was observed in most sixteen major fracking locations, but frequencies vary depending on geophysical environment. Furthermore, methane emissions show an increase of 2% across fracking operations in the US.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:00 AM Nov 17th, 8:15 AM

Seismic and Atmospheric Rise in Hydraulic Fracturing Operations across the United States

C323

Hydraulic Fracturing operations associated with horizontal drilling for oil/gas production in the US are known to induce earthquakes by wastewater injection. In recent years, numerous studies have shown a close relationship between induced seismic activities to the high-pressure injection of wastewater disposal, especially in Oklahoma, Southern Kansas, and Texas. In this paper, an analysis of sixteen major fracking operation locations across the US has been carried out to study the impact of horizontal wells and injected wastewater on earthquake activities. The seismic activities from the USGS earthquake catalog show an increase in the number of earthquakes within a radius of 150 km at the location of fracking operations in south central US, whereas no changes were observed in other US regions. Detailed earthquake data analysis on magnitude and proximity to fracking sites has shown that operations involved in horizontal drilling enhance seismic activities in the US. The stimulation of earthquakes depends not only on the amount of injected wastewater or horizontal well count, but largely on the geology and geophysical environment of the drilling site. Further, AQUA satellite data show an increasing trend of mole fraction methane concentrations associated with the oil/gas production.