Presentation Title

Fractionation and Structure Determination of a Ceramide Derivative That Inhibits Growth of Mycobacteria

Faculty Mentor

Jacqueline A. Trischman

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:45 AM

Location

C335

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial infection which affects the lungs. In order to treat an active infection, patients must adhere to multiple antibiotic regimens for up to 6-9 months. If a patient has acquired multidrug resistant TB, they may need to take antibiotics for up to 20-30 months. With the current threat of antibiotic resistance on the rise, it is crucial that new compounds be discovered which may result in new formulation for treatment. The bacterium M. marinum is a close genetic relative to M. tuberculosis (MTb) which differs only by genes coding for temperature. It is a pathogen to ectotherms and does not grow well above 32oC. Based on these properties, M. marinum is a suitable laboratory surrogate for MTb when testing the effects of antimicrobial compounds. A compound with antibiotic potential is present in the extract of marine bacterial strain UA-088. This bacterium was isolated from the local sea lettuce Ulva californica, grown on a large scale (>40L), extracted, fractionated through flash chromatography, and components were further purified through High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several years of effort have resulted in a pure compound that is now being investigated structurally. Though each step of my work on this project could be a talk by itself, this presentation will focus on final fractionation and structure elucidation.

Summary of research results to be presented

The initial isolation that was performed by others as well as work I participated in, such as large scale culture and extraction followed by flash chromatography, will be presented in the introduction of this work.

HPLC fractionation of the active compound was done over the summer, and LC/MS work along with multiple 2-D NMR techniques have been performed. Examination and interpretation of these results will be the focus of the presentation.

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Nov 17th, 10:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:45 AM

Fractionation and Structure Determination of a Ceramide Derivative That Inhibits Growth of Mycobacteria

C335

Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial infection which affects the lungs. In order to treat an active infection, patients must adhere to multiple antibiotic regimens for up to 6-9 months. If a patient has acquired multidrug resistant TB, they may need to take antibiotics for up to 20-30 months. With the current threat of antibiotic resistance on the rise, it is crucial that new compounds be discovered which may result in new formulation for treatment. The bacterium M. marinum is a close genetic relative to M. tuberculosis (MTb) which differs only by genes coding for temperature. It is a pathogen to ectotherms and does not grow well above 32oC. Based on these properties, M. marinum is a suitable laboratory surrogate for MTb when testing the effects of antimicrobial compounds. A compound with antibiotic potential is present in the extract of marine bacterial strain UA-088. This bacterium was isolated from the local sea lettuce Ulva californica, grown on a large scale (>40L), extracted, fractionated through flash chromatography, and components were further purified through High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several years of effort have resulted in a pure compound that is now being investigated structurally. Though each step of my work on this project could be a talk by itself, this presentation will focus on final fractionation and structure elucidation.