Presentation Title

Microfluidic Thread-Based Electrode System to Detect Glucose and Acetylthiocholine

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Frank A. Gomez

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C323

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Rapid technology growth has greatly enhanced the scope of real-time health monitoring, facilitating the incorporation of medical diagnostics into patients’ home healthcare regimens. Herein is described a reusable and simple electrochemical sensor using thread-based electrodes for the detection of both glucose and acetylthiocholine. The fabrication of the device consisted of two steps. First, three nylon-based electrodes (reference, working, and counter) were painted with conductive inks (silver and carbon ink, or silver/silver chloride ink). The electrodes were taped onto parafilm, and a piece of white nylon thread was wrapped around the three electrodes. For the glucose system, a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) (10 mg/mL) and potassium ferricyanide (K3[Fe(CN)6]) (10 mg/mL) as mediator was dried onto the thread. Incremental glucose concentrations (0-15 mM) were added and were proportional to the current output of the glucose oxidation measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). For the second system, a solution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) (0.08 U/mL) in PBS was added to the nylon thread, and increasing concentrations of acetylthiocholine (ATC) (0-9.84 mg/mL) were added and measured by CV. The current output from the oxidation of thiocholine (produced by AChE reacting with ATC) was proportional to concentrations of ATC. Graphs of current output vs. substrate concentration from both GOx/glucose and AChE/ATC systems were fitted with linear regression lines, giving R2 values of 0.985 and 0.995, respectively. Production costs of the sensors are low since they are reusable, composed of inexpensive materials, and require minimal reagents, making them well suited for resource-limited regions throughout the world where state-of-the-art POC diagnostic devices are not always available. Future work focuses on design modifications to improve detection of other analytes, thereby broadening the use of thread-based applications with the goal of improving the health and well-being of society.

Summary of research results to be presented

For the detection of glucose using the thread electrode system, a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) (10 mg/mL) and potassium ferricyanide (K3[Fe(CN)6]) (10 mg/mL) as mediator was dried onto the thread. Incremental glucose concentrations (0-15 mM) were added and were proportional to the current output of the glucose oxidation measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). For the second system, a solution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) (0.08 U/mL) in PBS was added to the nylon thread. Increasing concentrations of acetylthiocholine (ATC) (0-9.84 mg/mL) were added and measured by CV. The current output from the oxidation of thiocholine (produced by AChE reacting with ATC) was proportional to concentrations of ATC. Graphs of current output vs. substrate concentration from both GOx/glucose and AChE/ATC systems were fitted with linear regression lines, producing R2 values of 0.985 and 0.995, respectively.

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Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

Microfluidic Thread-Based Electrode System to Detect Glucose and Acetylthiocholine

C323

Rapid technology growth has greatly enhanced the scope of real-time health monitoring, facilitating the incorporation of medical diagnostics into patients’ home healthcare regimens. Herein is described a reusable and simple electrochemical sensor using thread-based electrodes for the detection of both glucose and acetylthiocholine. The fabrication of the device consisted of two steps. First, three nylon-based electrodes (reference, working, and counter) were painted with conductive inks (silver and carbon ink, or silver/silver chloride ink). The electrodes were taped onto parafilm, and a piece of white nylon thread was wrapped around the three electrodes. For the glucose system, a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) (10 mg/mL) and potassium ferricyanide (K3[Fe(CN)6]) (10 mg/mL) as mediator was dried onto the thread. Incremental glucose concentrations (0-15 mM) were added and were proportional to the current output of the glucose oxidation measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). For the second system, a solution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) (0.08 U/mL) in PBS was added to the nylon thread, and increasing concentrations of acetylthiocholine (ATC) (0-9.84 mg/mL) were added and measured by CV. The current output from the oxidation of thiocholine (produced by AChE reacting with ATC) was proportional to concentrations of ATC. Graphs of current output vs. substrate concentration from both GOx/glucose and AChE/ATC systems were fitted with linear regression lines, giving R2 values of 0.985 and 0.995, respectively. Production costs of the sensors are low since they are reusable, composed of inexpensive materials, and require minimal reagents, making them well suited for resource-limited regions throughout the world where state-of-the-art POC diagnostic devices are not always available. Future work focuses on design modifications to improve detection of other analytes, thereby broadening the use of thread-based applications with the goal of improving the health and well-being of society.