Presentation Title

The Effects of the Resilient Families Program on Parents’ Child Rearing Practices

Faculty Mentor

Melanie Horn-Mallers

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 32

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Growing evidence indicates that children can demonstrate great resilience in the face of adversity, including poverty, if they have the right constellation of individual, family, and community protective factors; among at-risk preschoolers and kindergartners, this includes buffering the negative impact of ongoing stress and promoting resilience and school readiness, which are salient predictors for future academic and social successes. Over the last few years, we worked with 52 families in North Orange County (parents and their young children) and implemented the Resilient Families Program (RFP), an 8-week long intervention based on the neuropsychosocial model of resilience that highlights three interrelated core pathways: (1) increasing parent-child attachment; (2) increasing stress management/mindfulness; and (3) increasing executive function skills among children. Parent sessions involve discussions implemented in multiple formats, including games, role-play skits, and craft activities, as well as yoga and mindfulness activities. Child sessions include reading and discussing an age- appropriate book that is relevant to the weekly theme and playing games that are designed to improve mindfulness and executive function skills. Preliminary data of RFP indicate that parents who received RFP showed reductions in self-reports of depression, and children who received RFP showed increases in children’s social competence (parent report) and increases in self-regulation skills (direct assessment). Pre-post data also indicates a statistically significant increase in parent-child relationship quality. Indicating from the study, RFP helps decrease the risk of youth violence and strengthens children’s socio-emotional development from a younger age to help children master self-regulation skills.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of the Resilient Families Program on Parents’ Child Rearing Practices

HARBESON 32

Growing evidence indicates that children can demonstrate great resilience in the face of adversity, including poverty, if they have the right constellation of individual, family, and community protective factors; among at-risk preschoolers and kindergartners, this includes buffering the negative impact of ongoing stress and promoting resilience and school readiness, which are salient predictors for future academic and social successes. Over the last few years, we worked with 52 families in North Orange County (parents and their young children) and implemented the Resilient Families Program (RFP), an 8-week long intervention based on the neuropsychosocial model of resilience that highlights three interrelated core pathways: (1) increasing parent-child attachment; (2) increasing stress management/mindfulness; and (3) increasing executive function skills among children. Parent sessions involve discussions implemented in multiple formats, including games, role-play skits, and craft activities, as well as yoga and mindfulness activities. Child sessions include reading and discussing an age- appropriate book that is relevant to the weekly theme and playing games that are designed to improve mindfulness and executive function skills. Preliminary data of RFP indicate that parents who received RFP showed reductions in self-reports of depression, and children who received RFP showed increases in children’s social competence (parent report) and increases in self-regulation skills (direct assessment). Pre-post data also indicates a statistically significant increase in parent-child relationship quality. Indicating from the study, RFP helps decrease the risk of youth violence and strengthens children’s socio-emotional development from a younger age to help children master self-regulation skills.