Presentation Title

Birds Eye View: 3D Digitization of the Moore Lab of Zoology’s Bird Collection

Faculty Mentor

James Maley, John McCormack, Adam Liszkiewicz

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 101

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Showcasing collections can be exceedingly time consuming and even invasive, especially when the contents are rare, fragile, or sought after. Accessing these collections for research can be just as difficult or risky. VR and Photogrammetry allow for cutting-edge specimen digitization that allows viewers to access specimens from abroad, and create comprehensive 3D archives for preserving valuable collections.

Birds Eye View is an interactive digital archive containing choice specimens from the world’s largest Mexican bird collection, courtesy of the Moore Lab of Zoology at Occidental College. The taxidermied specimens are hosted in a digital archive that can be accessed in VR and shared online. Guests of the archive can manipulate and measure birds in virtual space, access collection data unique to each specimen, and create digital copies scaled all the way up to 500% their actual size. These specimens were digitized using Photogrammetry, which utilizes photographs and software to construct 3D scans. With all the affordability and non-invasiveness of traditional photography, photogrammetry accounts for a new dimension for collections digitization.

The archive is both a database and an interface, allowing the lab’s remarkable collection to be shared and showcased nearly anywhere, at any time, by anyone. It also serves as a prototype for creating future 3D digital archives and collections. Such archives would gives viewers the chance to bypass the physical accommodations of a lab or collection, allowing noninvasive access to delicate or remote artifacts and specimens. With macro-photographed textures with sub-milimetric volumetric accuracy, the fidelity of our models aims to allow for both meaningful research and public showcase. Using Photogrammetry and VR, Birds Eye View seeks to reexamine the limits of collections-based research, demonstrating an intuitive new way to access, showcase, and study the inaccessible.

Summary of research results to be presented

Photogrammetry is a highly new technology, still largely obtuse, and seldom used outside the field of computer graphics. In order for it to be of use at all in a collections context, the majority of our findings relate to the development of a procedure that integrates both software and hardware techniques. Our procedure has three major components:

A. An automated shooting procedure optimized for efficient, low-impact collections use.

B. A custom software pipeline to optimize and share scan data for remote viewing, storing, and studying

C. An Interactive 3D environment, both web-based and in VR, for use in archiving and showcasing the specimens

Our presented results would include a poster containing an overview of A and B. Given the nature of our research, we also hope to set up the VR archive alongside our poster for visitors to view our results in person. We have all of our own hardware for the setup, and could set it up ahead of time. It would require a space in front of the table of approximately 4' by 5' in order to be used, but shouldn't require any additional accommodations apart from a power supply.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Birds Eye View: 3D Digitization of the Moore Lab of Zoology’s Bird Collection

CREVELING 101

Showcasing collections can be exceedingly time consuming and even invasive, especially when the contents are rare, fragile, or sought after. Accessing these collections for research can be just as difficult or risky. VR and Photogrammetry allow for cutting-edge specimen digitization that allows viewers to access specimens from abroad, and create comprehensive 3D archives for preserving valuable collections.

Birds Eye View is an interactive digital archive containing choice specimens from the world’s largest Mexican bird collection, courtesy of the Moore Lab of Zoology at Occidental College. The taxidermied specimens are hosted in a digital archive that can be accessed in VR and shared online. Guests of the archive can manipulate and measure birds in virtual space, access collection data unique to each specimen, and create digital copies scaled all the way up to 500% their actual size. These specimens were digitized using Photogrammetry, which utilizes photographs and software to construct 3D scans. With all the affordability and non-invasiveness of traditional photography, photogrammetry accounts for a new dimension for collections digitization.

The archive is both a database and an interface, allowing the lab’s remarkable collection to be shared and showcased nearly anywhere, at any time, by anyone. It also serves as a prototype for creating future 3D digital archives and collections. Such archives would gives viewers the chance to bypass the physical accommodations of a lab or collection, allowing noninvasive access to delicate or remote artifacts and specimens. With macro-photographed textures with sub-milimetric volumetric accuracy, the fidelity of our models aims to allow for both meaningful research and public showcase. Using Photogrammetry and VR, Birds Eye View seeks to reexamine the limits of collections-based research, demonstrating an intuitive new way to access, showcase, and study the inaccessible.