Presentation Title

The Suture 3D Ring 3D Printed Heart Valve Tissue Model Improves and Promotes Healing of a Xenograft Interface of Porcine and Murine Cardiac Tissue.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. James Harber

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 102

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Cardiac tissue engineering, using unlimited therapeutic quantities of cardiac cells derived from the patient’s own tissue, are capable of functional integration when re-introduced as patches, gels, or infusions into to the patient. Improvements in the methods to replace cardiac cells to a zone of ischemic distress or valve failure include this lab’s previous experimental production of cardiac cells on suture as a “cardiothread.” This demonstrated that 3D printed disks that held the suture coated with murine cardiac cells could propagate a beat. The current experiments tested the hypothesis that five parallel sutures could potentially form a rectangular cardiac tissue between them, when suspended on a specially designed and printed 3D disc. The disc, in turn, held centimeter sized blocks of a porcine valve and heart tissue on opposite sides of the suture array. This arrangement mimics the gap spanned by multiple parallel sutures in a robotic surgery of human heart valve repair. The experimental methods included cell culture of the P19.CL6 mouse pluripotent cells, differentiated to cardiac cells in the presence of DMSO. Critical to the experiment were ultra-low adherent cell dish surfaces to suppress complicating cell growth outside the 3D model in a 6 well tissue culture dish. This xenograft model included a unique hydrogel of fibrinogen/thrombin and agar/gelatin. CAD software was used to improve the 3D printed “ring” model so that it could better hold the heart tissue suture in a manner consistent with heart valve repair surgery. The results showed considerable growth of cardiac cells between the tissue blocks in the rectangular matrix defined by the five parallel sutures. However, more experimental work needs to be done to encourage parallel growth of heart tissue to coordinate the beating for an experiment of this size. Approaches to improve the existing suture 3D ring model are discussed.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Suture 3D Ring 3D Printed Heart Valve Tissue Model Improves and Promotes Healing of a Xenograft Interface of Porcine and Murine Cardiac Tissue.

CREVELING 102

Cardiac tissue engineering, using unlimited therapeutic quantities of cardiac cells derived from the patient’s own tissue, are capable of functional integration when re-introduced as patches, gels, or infusions into to the patient. Improvements in the methods to replace cardiac cells to a zone of ischemic distress or valve failure include this lab’s previous experimental production of cardiac cells on suture as a “cardiothread.” This demonstrated that 3D printed disks that held the suture coated with murine cardiac cells could propagate a beat. The current experiments tested the hypothesis that five parallel sutures could potentially form a rectangular cardiac tissue between them, when suspended on a specially designed and printed 3D disc. The disc, in turn, held centimeter sized blocks of a porcine valve and heart tissue on opposite sides of the suture array. This arrangement mimics the gap spanned by multiple parallel sutures in a robotic surgery of human heart valve repair. The experimental methods included cell culture of the P19.CL6 mouse pluripotent cells, differentiated to cardiac cells in the presence of DMSO. Critical to the experiment were ultra-low adherent cell dish surfaces to suppress complicating cell growth outside the 3D model in a 6 well tissue culture dish. This xenograft model included a unique hydrogel of fibrinogen/thrombin and agar/gelatin. CAD software was used to improve the 3D printed “ring” model so that it could better hold the heart tissue suture in a manner consistent with heart valve repair surgery. The results showed considerable growth of cardiac cells between the tissue blocks in the rectangular matrix defined by the five parallel sutures. However, more experimental work needs to be done to encourage parallel growth of heart tissue to coordinate the beating for an experiment of this size. Approaches to improve the existing suture 3D ring model are discussed.