Presentation Title

Potential Correlation Between Chlorine Treated Drinking Water and Cancer Incidences

Faculty Mentor

Sylvine Deprele

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 103

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

The importance of clean water is a universal matter because water is utilized on a daily basis and is necessary for survival. Whether it be for drinking, bathing, or cooking, clean and safe water is a concern for many. In instances where individuals don’t have access to clean water, they opt for at home techniques, often without guidelines. While conducting a health survey in Peru, the interviewees were asked about the cleanness of water and why they felt it should be treated. Reasoning behind disinfecting their water varied, but they all felt it was necessary to do so. Since not everyone had access to bottled water, one of the techniques mentioned to disinfect the water included the use of chlorine. Out of the people surveyed, it was found that about 20% of families routinely resort to chlorine to treat their water. These findings are of some concern due to the effects that residual chlorine could be playing in the overall health of individuals. In addition to vital risks from the chlorine itself, there are also a series of other issues that arise from chlorination byproducts, formed from reactions between disinfectants and naturally occurring organic matter and anthropogenic contaminants. One of these byproducts is trihalomethane, a compound fairly similar to chloroform. Exposure to chlorination byproducts is known to increase the rate for certain cancers like bladder, colon, and rectal cancer. Such findings should be of high concern considering that some of the effects mentioned above result from consumption of professionally treated water. Therefore, the effects resulting from water treated by homemakers can be amplified and even more detrimental. Overall, at home treatments of water utilized by many Peruvians may be unsafe and could generate increasing carcinogens consumption, potentially leading to cell damage and a higher risk of cancer.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Potential Correlation Between Chlorine Treated Drinking Water and Cancer Incidences

CREVELING 103

The importance of clean water is a universal matter because water is utilized on a daily basis and is necessary for survival. Whether it be for drinking, bathing, or cooking, clean and safe water is a concern for many. In instances where individuals don’t have access to clean water, they opt for at home techniques, often without guidelines. While conducting a health survey in Peru, the interviewees were asked about the cleanness of water and why they felt it should be treated. Reasoning behind disinfecting their water varied, but they all felt it was necessary to do so. Since not everyone had access to bottled water, one of the techniques mentioned to disinfect the water included the use of chlorine. Out of the people surveyed, it was found that about 20% of families routinely resort to chlorine to treat their water. These findings are of some concern due to the effects that residual chlorine could be playing in the overall health of individuals. In addition to vital risks from the chlorine itself, there are also a series of other issues that arise from chlorination byproducts, formed from reactions between disinfectants and naturally occurring organic matter and anthropogenic contaminants. One of these byproducts is trihalomethane, a compound fairly similar to chloroform. Exposure to chlorination byproducts is known to increase the rate for certain cancers like bladder, colon, and rectal cancer. Such findings should be of high concern considering that some of the effects mentioned above result from consumption of professionally treated water. Therefore, the effects resulting from water treated by homemakers can be amplified and even more detrimental. Overall, at home treatments of water utilized by many Peruvians may be unsafe and could generate increasing carcinogens consumption, potentially leading to cell damage and a higher risk of cancer.