Presentation Title

A Legal and Ethical Examination of Photorealistic Videos Created Using Artificial Neural Networks

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Atreyee Phukan

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 108

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

The development of photorealistic (or fake) videos, created using artificial neural networks establishes alarming ethical and legal consequences in regards to individual rights. There are two distinct types of fake videos: one is made by manipulating existing videos (DeepFakes) and the other by creating new videos that never happened (Deep Video Portraits). Artificial Neural Networks have come about as a result of advancements in Deep Learning—a type of artificial intelligence technology. One does not necessarily need specialized knowledge to create a fake video; one can use an accessible application called “FakeApp” or independently create a photorealistic video using, for example, a few high-resolution images or a short video of a person. Presently, no laws claim that the process of making fake videos using artificial neural networks is illegal; however, their creation may lead to civil wrongs—such as Defamation or False Light Invasion of Privacy. The potential for civil wrong leads to problems regarding accountability and liability; if the video that led to damage of reputation, for example, was fake, who should bear the burden of the offense? Through an examination of the law, my research introduces possible legal, philosophical, and ethical answers if a case involving photorealistic videos created with artificial neural networks were to arise—with a focus on individual rights, rather than societal effects. The question of who could best regulate these videos, considering the U.S. Constitution and the safety of individuals, is also discussed. These questions are examined through an interdisciplinary lens, pulling from the law, ethical theories, and technological terminology. Since rapid development of technology often outpaces the government and policy makers until it is too late, an inquiry into how the law may adapt to photorealistic videos proves important for society at large.

Summary of research results to be presented

N/A

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

A Legal and Ethical Examination of Photorealistic Videos Created Using Artificial Neural Networks

CREVELING 108

The development of photorealistic (or fake) videos, created using artificial neural networks establishes alarming ethical and legal consequences in regards to individual rights. There are two distinct types of fake videos: one is made by manipulating existing videos (DeepFakes) and the other by creating new videos that never happened (Deep Video Portraits). Artificial Neural Networks have come about as a result of advancements in Deep Learning—a type of artificial intelligence technology. One does not necessarily need specialized knowledge to create a fake video; one can use an accessible application called “FakeApp” or independently create a photorealistic video using, for example, a few high-resolution images or a short video of a person. Presently, no laws claim that the process of making fake videos using artificial neural networks is illegal; however, their creation may lead to civil wrongs—such as Defamation or False Light Invasion of Privacy. The potential for civil wrong leads to problems regarding accountability and liability; if the video that led to damage of reputation, for example, was fake, who should bear the burden of the offense? Through an examination of the law, my research introduces possible legal, philosophical, and ethical answers if a case involving photorealistic videos created with artificial neural networks were to arise—with a focus on individual rights, rather than societal effects. The question of who could best regulate these videos, considering the U.S. Constitution and the safety of individuals, is also discussed. These questions are examined through an interdisciplinary lens, pulling from the law, ethical theories, and technological terminology. Since rapid development of technology often outpaces the government and policy makers until it is too late, an inquiry into how the law may adapt to photorealistic videos proves important for society at large.