Presentation Title

The effect of Uncaria tomentosa on acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel

Faculty Mentor

Sylvine Deprele, Lia Roberts, and Luiza Nogaj

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 99

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

For thousands of years, the indigenous women of Peru have relied on traditional medicine as a method for treating illnesses. While conventional medicine exists in Peru today, women continuously turn to the remedies they know and trust when modern medicine is inaccessible. The vast amounts of ethnopharmacological plants are utilized for a large span of conditions such as digestion, headaches, and inflammation. In particular, Uncaria tomentosa commonly known as Cat’s claw, a bark like plant native to the Amazonian regions of Peru has been investigated for its historical anti-inflammatory uses and was found to contain many antioxidant properties. However, not much is known about the effects of U. tomentosa on the molecular mechanism of drugs such as paclitaxel (taxol) and acetylsalicyclic acid (aspirin). To address this question, a randomized survey was conducted on women and health care providers within the region of Cusco, Peru. The survey revealed that U. tomentosa remains a prominent healing aid within the Peruvian culture. In addition the survey showed that women overwhelmingly chose natural remedies over professional medical care. The following investigation was conducted to test the in vitro effects of U. tomentosa on the molecular mechanism of drugs paclitaxel and acetylsalicyclic acid on MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines. An optimal concentration of paclitaxel and acetylsalicyclic acid was established for further use in viability assays, MTT and Cytotoxicity. Preliminary data suggests that a 0.4 uM concentration of paclitaxel decreases cell viability by 55% and a 0.4 mM concentration of aspirin decreases cell viability by 60% in both cell lines. In addition, the preliminary data from molecular viability assay shows that the addition of U. tomentosa to acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel have an additive effect. Further analysis is necessary to determine the molecular mechanism of U. tomentosa on the activity of acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The effect of Uncaria tomentosa on acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel

CREVELING 99

For thousands of years, the indigenous women of Peru have relied on traditional medicine as a method for treating illnesses. While conventional medicine exists in Peru today, women continuously turn to the remedies they know and trust when modern medicine is inaccessible. The vast amounts of ethnopharmacological plants are utilized for a large span of conditions such as digestion, headaches, and inflammation. In particular, Uncaria tomentosa commonly known as Cat’s claw, a bark like plant native to the Amazonian regions of Peru has been investigated for its historical anti-inflammatory uses and was found to contain many antioxidant properties. However, not much is known about the effects of U. tomentosa on the molecular mechanism of drugs such as paclitaxel (taxol) and acetylsalicyclic acid (aspirin). To address this question, a randomized survey was conducted on women and health care providers within the region of Cusco, Peru. The survey revealed that U. tomentosa remains a prominent healing aid within the Peruvian culture. In addition the survey showed that women overwhelmingly chose natural remedies over professional medical care. The following investigation was conducted to test the in vitro effects of U. tomentosa on the molecular mechanism of drugs paclitaxel and acetylsalicyclic acid on MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines. An optimal concentration of paclitaxel and acetylsalicyclic acid was established for further use in viability assays, MTT and Cytotoxicity. Preliminary data suggests that a 0.4 uM concentration of paclitaxel decreases cell viability by 55% and a 0.4 mM concentration of aspirin decreases cell viability by 60% in both cell lines. In addition, the preliminary data from molecular viability assay shows that the addition of U. tomentosa to acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel have an additive effect. Further analysis is necessary to determine the molecular mechanism of U. tomentosa on the activity of acetylsalicyclic acid and paclitaxel.