Presentation Title

You Snooze You Win: Disrupted Sleep and its Short and Long Term Consequences on the Cognitive, Physiological and the Psychological Functions Of Adolescents

Presenter Information

Risa GotoFollow

Faculty Mentor

Lewis Long

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:45 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:00 AM

Location

C301

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Disrupted sleep, characterized by a loss, as well as a desynchronization of sleep relative to the social schedules that many public institutions run on, are particularly prevalent in adolescents. These current social schedules are based on the outdated schedules of industrial workers during the 19th century, who were awake from early morning until late evening due to extended periods of labor (Crary 2013 p.9-10), which, despite reports of sleep disorders resulting from this schedule, spread to other public domains, and has persisted to the present day. As adolescents experience a shift in the circadian rhythm enabling them to both sleep and wake up at a later time (Bittencourt et.al 2010 p.22), their biological needs clash with the current social schedule that steer their associated institutions such as schools, forcing them to get up earlier than the rest of society, contrasting their preference of later start times. Evidently, 75% of American K-12 public schools start before 8.30 a.m (Wheaton et.al 2015 p.1-2), with adolescents having little to no choice but to follow their disruptive schedules. Adolescents are therefore exposed to immediate and permanent consequences to their cognitive functions and brain development, as well as an increased risk of long-term, chronic illnesses such as obesity and depression. In order to better accommodate the current generation, there is a need to address the misconceptions regarding the costs of delaying start times, thereby shedding light on the incoherent concerns raised by various stakeholders, and take a legislative approach to impose a delayed start time for K-12 schools on a national level. Doing so will ensure that an adolescent’s health is prioritized before their social needs, and will gradually reduce the harmful effects of a deeply ingrained public health issue affecting the vulnerable future generation.

Summary of research results to be presented

Adolescents in the United States enrolled in K-12 are at particular risk of developing disrupted sleep, consisting of both a loss and delayed sleep relative to the social schedule that their schools run on. Consequently, adolescents may experience both short and long-term repercussions on their cognitive, psychological and physiological health. Despite current research suggesting a biological need for adolescents to stay up, as well as get up at a later hour, stakeholders- parents, teachers, and even students themselves, oppose the idea of a delayed school start time due to the perceived costs associated with the delay. Nonetheless, the concerns raised are incoherent and fallacious, indicating the need to address these arguments, and thereafter take a legislative approach to delay school start times for K-12 public schools, in order to better prioritize the health of adolescents.

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Nov 17th, 8:45 AM Nov 17th, 9:00 AM

You Snooze You Win: Disrupted Sleep and its Short and Long Term Consequences on the Cognitive, Physiological and the Psychological Functions Of Adolescents

C301

Disrupted sleep, characterized by a loss, as well as a desynchronization of sleep relative to the social schedules that many public institutions run on, are particularly prevalent in adolescents. These current social schedules are based on the outdated schedules of industrial workers during the 19th century, who were awake from early morning until late evening due to extended periods of labor (Crary 2013 p.9-10), which, despite reports of sleep disorders resulting from this schedule, spread to other public domains, and has persisted to the present day. As adolescents experience a shift in the circadian rhythm enabling them to both sleep and wake up at a later time (Bittencourt et.al 2010 p.22), their biological needs clash with the current social schedule that steer their associated institutions such as schools, forcing them to get up earlier than the rest of society, contrasting their preference of later start times. Evidently, 75% of American K-12 public schools start before 8.30 a.m (Wheaton et.al 2015 p.1-2), with adolescents having little to no choice but to follow their disruptive schedules. Adolescents are therefore exposed to immediate and permanent consequences to their cognitive functions and brain development, as well as an increased risk of long-term, chronic illnesses such as obesity and depression. In order to better accommodate the current generation, there is a need to address the misconceptions regarding the costs of delaying start times, thereby shedding light on the incoherent concerns raised by various stakeholders, and take a legislative approach to impose a delayed start time for K-12 schools on a national level. Doing so will ensure that an adolescent’s health is prioritized before their social needs, and will gradually reduce the harmful effects of a deeply ingrained public health issue affecting the vulnerable future generation.