Presentation Title

The Dramatic Arc in Sonified Storms

Faculty Mentor

Richard Zucker

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:15 AM

Location

C301

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

interdisciplinary

Abstract

Art is a story of human experience, from the exposition and climax of events to their denouement. Artists take inspiration from the natural world and understand it through their interpretations of art. One form of art, music composition for example, follows a general structure referred to as the dramatic arc (Murray, 1990). Since music is an auditory progression of events, representing natural phenomena as music would logically produce a natural dramatic arc. By taking elements of storm maturity to parallel musical features, an imposed dramatic structure might provide insights in storm maturity and decay. Frédéric Chopin’s “Winter Wind” denotes temperature as pitch, wind speed as tempo, and wind changes as volume. In “Winter Wind,” the sudden cascades of forte sixteenth-note-tuplets signify gusts of cold wind. Using “Winter Wind” as a parallel of physical sonification, or conversion of data to sound, I transposed data of weather that produced tropical storms to music. Using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s buoy data, I processed sea surface temperature, barometric pressure, and wind speed before, during, and after tropical storms. From Chopin’s example, sea surface temperature is analogous to note pitch, as wind speed is to note duration, and as barometric pressure is to volume. This research imposes a dramatic arc on storms to attempt to understand weather patterns through music and the possible identification of natural events through motifs in sonified data.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results of this research include the successful conversion of tropical storms to music and the identification of a dramatic structure within sonified storms. This research also implies that the dramatic arc can be used to understand natural phenomena. A product of this research is the possible prediction of natural events through the classification of motifs which tend to result in a sonified climax. This research also opens the possibility for efficient and accessible prediction methods of natural disasters using fewer variables than existing methods.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 10:15 AM

The Dramatic Arc in Sonified Storms

C301

Art is a story of human experience, from the exposition and climax of events to their denouement. Artists take inspiration from the natural world and understand it through their interpretations of art. One form of art, music composition for example, follows a general structure referred to as the dramatic arc (Murray, 1990). Since music is an auditory progression of events, representing natural phenomena as music would logically produce a natural dramatic arc. By taking elements of storm maturity to parallel musical features, an imposed dramatic structure might provide insights in storm maturity and decay. Frédéric Chopin’s “Winter Wind” denotes temperature as pitch, wind speed as tempo, and wind changes as volume. In “Winter Wind,” the sudden cascades of forte sixteenth-note-tuplets signify gusts of cold wind. Using “Winter Wind” as a parallel of physical sonification, or conversion of data to sound, I transposed data of weather that produced tropical storms to music. Using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s buoy data, I processed sea surface temperature, barometric pressure, and wind speed before, during, and after tropical storms. From Chopin’s example, sea surface temperature is analogous to note pitch, as wind speed is to note duration, and as barometric pressure is to volume. This research imposes a dramatic arc on storms to attempt to understand weather patterns through music and the possible identification of natural events through motifs in sonified data.