Presentation Title

A Plea for Restoring the Understanding of Dance as High Art: The Importance of Pedagogy

Faculty Mentor

Joan Wines

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

C301

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Dance choreography and performance have been traditional partners of other high arts. A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Don Quijote are two instances of literature adapted to the ballet, and Picasso’s set design for choreographed operas, like Parade, is an example of art’s integration with dance. Regrettably, this historic partnership is being threatened, especially in the United States. Dance pedagogy should parallel the classroom environment in order to give students the opportunity to embody what it truly means to be an artist. In England, professors train their dance students within the structure of the British academic system. Similarly, American universities also offer dance curricula. These academic methods strive to teach dancers to prioritize personal purpose, intellectual scope, and to contribute to a unified, appreciative community of recognizing dance as high art. Unfortunately, the American dance studio industry has been evolving into a system that breeds hostility and a sense of entitlement. The American private studio lacks curricula that should include the history of dance, teaching of dance, and the exposure to a wide range of methods of dance in the context of community and political statement. Private studios do not acquire the prestigious values of the European and American university systems. Nor do they require that their instructors earn a credential in dance pedagogy. Many instructors who teach for the studio environment have lost sight of the communal and artistic importance of dance, breeding narcissistic dancers who are unappreciative of dance as art. In a realm of dance that is increasingly exploited by the media, the promotion of dance as a high art in private studios in America is lost. The hope is that the influence of the integration of an improved dance pedagogy can make its way to the consciousness of the studio.

Summary of research results to be presented

Oral presentation. Established curricula for private dance institutions in America that should include the history of dance, teaching of dance, and the exposure to a wide range of methods of dance in the context of community and political statement.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 10:15 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

A Plea for Restoring the Understanding of Dance as High Art: The Importance of Pedagogy

C301

Dance choreography and performance have been traditional partners of other high arts. A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Don Quijote are two instances of literature adapted to the ballet, and Picasso’s set design for choreographed operas, like Parade, is an example of art’s integration with dance. Regrettably, this historic partnership is being threatened, especially in the United States. Dance pedagogy should parallel the classroom environment in order to give students the opportunity to embody what it truly means to be an artist. In England, professors train their dance students within the structure of the British academic system. Similarly, American universities also offer dance curricula. These academic methods strive to teach dancers to prioritize personal purpose, intellectual scope, and to contribute to a unified, appreciative community of recognizing dance as high art. Unfortunately, the American dance studio industry has been evolving into a system that breeds hostility and a sense of entitlement. The American private studio lacks curricula that should include the history of dance, teaching of dance, and the exposure to a wide range of methods of dance in the context of community and political statement. Private studios do not acquire the prestigious values of the European and American university systems. Nor do they require that their instructors earn a credential in dance pedagogy. Many instructors who teach for the studio environment have lost sight of the communal and artistic importance of dance, breeding narcissistic dancers who are unappreciative of dance as art. In a realm of dance that is increasingly exploited by the media, the promotion of dance as a high art in private studios in America is lost. The hope is that the influence of the integration of an improved dance pedagogy can make its way to the consciousness of the studio.