Presentation Title

Effect of Supplemental Instruction in a Community College

Presenter Information

Kassandra FloresFollow

Faculty Mentor

Rachel Baker

Start Date

17-11-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

Location

C164

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Community colleges provide an accessible pathway to complete higher education for many students. Researchers found that within a cohort of nationally representative students who enrolled in postsecondary educational institutes, only 12% of those who first enrolled in public two-year institutions obtained a bachelor's degree within six years; however, 54% of students who were enrolled at four-year institutions had received their bachelor’s degree within six years. This is troublesome, as within the California Community College System the majority of incoming students express interest in transferring but only 4% transfer within 2 years, 25% within 3 years, and 38% within six years. Some of the strongest positive predictors of transfer from a community college to a four-year institution include cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) and cumulative credits. Among community college students, remediation in math courses have a negative effect on bachelor’s attainment. This may be a result of different academic and financial resources across community college campuses compared to four-year institutions. Supplemental Instruction (SI), created by the University of Missouri-Kansas, is a peer-led academic support program in which students participate in discussion groups outside of the class. SI has been consistently correlated with academic success across multiple disciplines including but not limited to Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), humanities, and social science courses. The current study examines the effect of SI in one community college. The effect of SI will be examined across different groups of students including disproportionately impacted students and first-generation college students. The effect of SI will also be examined across different courses, including remedial courses as well as STEM and non-STEM courses. Existing SI data is currently being analyzed.

Summary of research results to be presented

The effect of SI will be examined across different groups of students including disproportionately impacted students and first-generation college students. The effect of SI will also be examined across different courses, including remedial courses as well as STEM and non-STEM courses. Existing SI data is currently being analyzed. Preliminary results show a small but positive interaction between SI attendance and student GPA but further statistical tests have not been conducted yet.

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Nov 17th, 1:45 PM Nov 17th, 2:00 PM

Effect of Supplemental Instruction in a Community College

C164

Community colleges provide an accessible pathway to complete higher education for many students. Researchers found that within a cohort of nationally representative students who enrolled in postsecondary educational institutes, only 12% of those who first enrolled in public two-year institutions obtained a bachelor's degree within six years; however, 54% of students who were enrolled at four-year institutions had received their bachelor’s degree within six years. This is troublesome, as within the California Community College System the majority of incoming students express interest in transferring but only 4% transfer within 2 years, 25% within 3 years, and 38% within six years. Some of the strongest positive predictors of transfer from a community college to a four-year institution include cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) and cumulative credits. Among community college students, remediation in math courses have a negative effect on bachelor’s attainment. This may be a result of different academic and financial resources across community college campuses compared to four-year institutions. Supplemental Instruction (SI), created by the University of Missouri-Kansas, is a peer-led academic support program in which students participate in discussion groups outside of the class. SI has been consistently correlated with academic success across multiple disciplines including but not limited to Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), humanities, and social science courses. The current study examines the effect of SI in one community college. The effect of SI will be examined across different groups of students including disproportionately impacted students and first-generation college students. The effect of SI will also be examined across different courses, including remedial courses as well as STEM and non-STEM courses. Existing SI data is currently being analyzed.