Presentation Title

An Innovative Student-Driven Curriculum that Advances Human Stem Cell Regeneration and Cardiac Valve Repair Pedagogy

Faculty Mentor

Dr. James Harber

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

Location

C164

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Age-related loss of cardiomyocytes is potentially reversible with innovative cell therapies. Over the past seven years, this lab produced a powerful teaching model, CTE3D (Cardiogenesis Tissue Engineering in 3D), which addresses the deficit of highly trained technicians in human cell culture applications. CTE3D’s approach emphasized innovation amidst yearly uncertain experimental outcomes, consistent with the NSF/AAAS Vision and Change recommendations. This project aimed to model a clinical scenario wherein cardiac tissue derived from the patient is grown in laboratory tissue culture, modified genetically, and returned to the patient as a therapeutic living surgical suture in a heart valve repair model. The CTE3D curriculum encourages students to develop open outcome-based experiments and develop six-week project goals that consistently lead to innovation in a specific sequence of pedagogy. The CTE3D hypothesis is that open scientific inquiry, the use of advanced laboratory techniques in cardiac stem cells, 3D printing technologies, wound repair, and surgical threads embedded with pluripotent cells CTE3D yield meaningful exploratory knowledge that undergraduate pre-health majors and medical students regularly seek out. Over the course of six summers, CTE3D has experienced three main phases of innovation using identical raw materials available for designing experiments. Students of CTE3D initially constructed simple moving models with cardiac cells on fibrin (summers 2012-2015). In phase two, they were able to 3D print the shapes that led to a suture thread embedded with pre-cardiac cells (summers 2016-2017). The third phase of the project (summer 2018) led to an intriguing suture 3D tissue culture model for heart and valve interface repair (as in human valve surgery). The successes and lessons learned from the CTE3D open inquiry hypothesis is evaluated in this presentation. Students who complete the CTE3D curriculum demonstrably pursue interests in stem cell research for medicine as measured by student career choice outcomes.

Summary of research results to be presented

The most recent summer 2018 (phase three) project built upon previous summer innovations by utilizing a “cardiothread” collagen-based suture embedded with murine pre-cardiac cells that were used to repair a gap between porcine heart and valve tissue. The porcine heart and valve tissue were held in place by an in-house CAD designed 3D printed “ring” built for observing in traditional 6 well tissue culture dishes. During phase two (summers 2015-2016), students utilized CTE3D curriculum by inventing their first 3D devices to hold small, beating suture threads on the collagen substrate. The first developmental phase of CTE3D took the longest, with the initial objectives of obtaining robust beating from in house differentiated murine cardiac stem cells, controlling the directionality of polymerization of fibrin to obtain synchronous beating in parallel planes and other shapes. The CTE3D curriculum is inspired by the NSF/AAAS philosophy of Vision and Change which encourages open-ended scientific experiments as primary research experiences.

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Nov 17th, 2:00 PM Nov 17th, 2:15 PM

An Innovative Student-Driven Curriculum that Advances Human Stem Cell Regeneration and Cardiac Valve Repair Pedagogy

C164

Age-related loss of cardiomyocytes is potentially reversible with innovative cell therapies. Over the past seven years, this lab produced a powerful teaching model, CTE3D (Cardiogenesis Tissue Engineering in 3D), which addresses the deficit of highly trained technicians in human cell culture applications. CTE3D’s approach emphasized innovation amidst yearly uncertain experimental outcomes, consistent with the NSF/AAAS Vision and Change recommendations. This project aimed to model a clinical scenario wherein cardiac tissue derived from the patient is grown in laboratory tissue culture, modified genetically, and returned to the patient as a therapeutic living surgical suture in a heart valve repair model. The CTE3D curriculum encourages students to develop open outcome-based experiments and develop six-week project goals that consistently lead to innovation in a specific sequence of pedagogy. The CTE3D hypothesis is that open scientific inquiry, the use of advanced laboratory techniques in cardiac stem cells, 3D printing technologies, wound repair, and surgical threads embedded with pluripotent cells CTE3D yield meaningful exploratory knowledge that undergraduate pre-health majors and medical students regularly seek out. Over the course of six summers, CTE3D has experienced three main phases of innovation using identical raw materials available for designing experiments. Students of CTE3D initially constructed simple moving models with cardiac cells on fibrin (summers 2012-2015). In phase two, they were able to 3D print the shapes that led to a suture thread embedded with pre-cardiac cells (summers 2016-2017). The third phase of the project (summer 2018) led to an intriguing suture 3D tissue culture model for heart and valve interface repair (as in human valve surgery). The successes and lessons learned from the CTE3D open inquiry hypothesis is evaluated in this presentation. Students who complete the CTE3D curriculum demonstrably pursue interests in stem cell research for medicine as measured by student career choice outcomes.