Presentation Title

Mapping the Resonance Frequencies of Different Regions of the Skull

Faculty Mentor

Ricky Wong

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 18

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Research Abstract

Bone conduction, a technology that was originally used to treat hearing-impaired patients, has taken center stage as the new audio technology of the 21st century. By circumventing the eardrum, bone conduction headphones are capable of delivering music without blocking out the ambient sound. However, this convenience comes at a cost of losing a significant amount of audio quality. We hypothesized that this is due to the limited resonance frequency range of the temporal bones where “bonephones” are usually placed at. To quantitatively determine these frequency ranges, a bone oscillator was placed on different parts of the subject’s head to vibrate at different frequencies within the audible spectrum (20 Hz ~ 20 kHz). The oscillator vibrated continuously at a specific interval of frequencies from low to high. A button was used for the subject to press when he/she perceives maximum intensity of the sound. Our results indeed showed a variation of resonance frequencies throughout the skull. The most significant variations came from the occipital bone, 50~320 Hz (low), the temporal bone, 700~1.4 kHz (mid), and the parietal bone, 1.8 to 2 kHz (high). By studying the various resonance frequency ranges of the different regions of the skull, we believe that this can achieve a higher level of bone conduction technology. This research could have various applications in VR (virtual reality helmets), 5G audio networking (e.g. bone conduction hearing headrests) and many other aspects that make use of the technology.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Mapping the Resonance Frequencies of Different Regions of the Skull

CREVELING 18

Research Abstract

Bone conduction, a technology that was originally used to treat hearing-impaired patients, has taken center stage as the new audio technology of the 21st century. By circumventing the eardrum, bone conduction headphones are capable of delivering music without blocking out the ambient sound. However, this convenience comes at a cost of losing a significant amount of audio quality. We hypothesized that this is due to the limited resonance frequency range of the temporal bones where “bonephones” are usually placed at. To quantitatively determine these frequency ranges, a bone oscillator was placed on different parts of the subject’s head to vibrate at different frequencies within the audible spectrum (20 Hz ~ 20 kHz). The oscillator vibrated continuously at a specific interval of frequencies from low to high. A button was used for the subject to press when he/she perceives maximum intensity of the sound. Our results indeed showed a variation of resonance frequencies throughout the skull. The most significant variations came from the occipital bone, 50~320 Hz (low), the temporal bone, 700~1.4 kHz (mid), and the parietal bone, 1.8 to 2 kHz (high). By studying the various resonance frequency ranges of the different regions of the skull, we believe that this can achieve a higher level of bone conduction technology. This research could have various applications in VR (virtual reality helmets), 5G audio networking (e.g. bone conduction hearing headrests) and many other aspects that make use of the technology.