Presentation Title

Patient Trust in Healthcare Providers and the Use of Natural and Traditional Medicines

Presenter Information

Emely ReardonFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lia Roberts

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 2

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Studies have shown that patient trust of physicians and health care workers have an effect on the types of treatments patients choose and on overall healthcare outcomes. A meta-analysis study by J. Birkhauer and J. Gaab has shown that patients reported more beneficial health behaviors, fewer symptoms, a higher quality of life, and were more satisfied with treatment when they had higher trust in their healthcare professional. Studies have also shown that many indigenous populations around the globe use traditional or natural medicines in place of or in combinations with westernized medical care. specifically, a study of Australian Aboriginal communities conducted by Stefanie J Oliver has shown that many indigenous Australians use natural or traditional medicine concurrently and complimentarily with western biomedical healthcare.

This study aims to explore the connection between a patient’s trust of medical providers and the use of indigenous or alternative natural remedies. Drawing on survey data from indigenous Peruvian communities as well as patient surveys conducted in hospital settings, this research shows that individuals with lower reported levels of trust in their healthcare providers are more likely to seek out alternative or natural remedies in place of or in conjunction with westernized medical care. The effect of low patient trust on health outcomes may be expressed in regular use or more reliance on natural remedies and cultural healing practices.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Patient Trust in Healthcare Providers and the Use of Natural and Traditional Medicines

CREVELING 2

Studies have shown that patient trust of physicians and health care workers have an effect on the types of treatments patients choose and on overall healthcare outcomes. A meta-analysis study by J. Birkhauer and J. Gaab has shown that patients reported more beneficial health behaviors, fewer symptoms, a higher quality of life, and were more satisfied with treatment when they had higher trust in their healthcare professional. Studies have also shown that many indigenous populations around the globe use traditional or natural medicines in place of or in combinations with westernized medical care. specifically, a study of Australian Aboriginal communities conducted by Stefanie J Oliver has shown that many indigenous Australians use natural or traditional medicine concurrently and complimentarily with western biomedical healthcare.

This study aims to explore the connection between a patient’s trust of medical providers and the use of indigenous or alternative natural remedies. Drawing on survey data from indigenous Peruvian communities as well as patient surveys conducted in hospital settings, this research shows that individuals with lower reported levels of trust in their healthcare providers are more likely to seek out alternative or natural remedies in place of or in conjunction with westernized medical care. The effect of low patient trust on health outcomes may be expressed in regular use or more reliance on natural remedies and cultural healing practices.