Presentation Title

Psychological and Neurocognitive Processes of the Dark Triad: An Analysis of Cultural Differences

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kimmy Kee-Rose

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 20

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The Dark Triad consists of personality traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy. A few studies have shown these traits to be helpful in facilitating achievement career goals and mate selection. Furthermore, narcissism traits have correlated with greater skills in crisis management, initiation, and persuasion.More recently, Machiavellianism and psychopathy traits have been demonstrated to be associated with poorer self-control, whereas narcissism and psychopathy traits have been linked to impulsivity. However, little is known about the relationships between Dark Triad traits and culture identification.This ongoing study compares 31 (19 Hispanic/Latino and 12 Caucasian) university students with traits of psychopathy and Machiavellianism (P/M) versus 45 (27 Hispanic/Latino and 18 Caucasian) students with traits of Narcissism (Narc) on aspects of psychological processes (self-deception and impression management) and neurocognition (self-control and inhibition). Participants’ personality traits were assessed using the Short Dark Triad questionnaire, whereas psychological processes were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using the Tangney Self-Control Scale and Stop-it Inhibition Test. A series of 2 (Culture Group) x 2 (Dark Triad Traits) Analyses of Variance revealed a significant Group by Traits interaction in self-deception, (F(1, 75)=5.081, p=.027, eta-squared=.0.058), with students with Narc traits showing higher levels of self-deception compared to their counterparts with P/M traits (p=.001). The group effect was not found between Hispanic/Latino and Caucasians students (p=0.91). No significant Group by Traits interactions were found for impression management (F(1, 75)=2.342, p=.13, eta-squared=0.028), self-control (F(1, 75)=0.047, p=.828, eta-squared=0.0007) or inhibition (F(1, 75)=1.03, p=.314, eta-squared=0.014). However, individuals with Narc traits scored significantly higher on impression management and showed a faster response inhibition time compared to those with P/M traits (p=.006andp=.049, respectively).These preliminary findings could potentially expand our understanding the specific roles of psychological and neurocognitive processes in individuals with Dark Triad traits of different cultural backgrounds.

Summary of research results to be presented

A series of 2 (Culture Group) x 2 (Dark Triad Traits) Analyses of Variance revealed a significant Group by Traits interaction in self-deception, (F(1, 75)=5.081, p=.027, eta-squared=.0.058), with students with Narc traits showing higher levels of self-deception compared to their counterparts with P/M traits (p=.001). The group effect was not found between Hispanic/Latino and Caucasians students (p=0.91). No significant Group by Traits interactions were found for impression management (F(1, 75)=2.342, p=.13, eta-squared=0.028), self-control (F(1, 75)=0.047, p=.828, eta-squared=0.0007) or inhibition (F(1, 75)=1.03, p=.314, eta-squared=0.014). However, individuals with Narc traits scored significantly higher on impression management and showed a faster response inhibition time compared to those with P/M traits (p=.006and p=.049, respectively).

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Psychological and Neurocognitive Processes of the Dark Triad: An Analysis of Cultural Differences

CREVELING 20

The Dark Triad consists of personality traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy. A few studies have shown these traits to be helpful in facilitating achievement career goals and mate selection. Furthermore, narcissism traits have correlated with greater skills in crisis management, initiation, and persuasion.More recently, Machiavellianism and psychopathy traits have been demonstrated to be associated with poorer self-control, whereas narcissism and psychopathy traits have been linked to impulsivity. However, little is known about the relationships between Dark Triad traits and culture identification.This ongoing study compares 31 (19 Hispanic/Latino and 12 Caucasian) university students with traits of psychopathy and Machiavellianism (P/M) versus 45 (27 Hispanic/Latino and 18 Caucasian) students with traits of Narcissism (Narc) on aspects of psychological processes (self-deception and impression management) and neurocognition (self-control and inhibition). Participants’ personality traits were assessed using the Short Dark Triad questionnaire, whereas psychological processes were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using the Tangney Self-Control Scale and Stop-it Inhibition Test. A series of 2 (Culture Group) x 2 (Dark Triad Traits) Analyses of Variance revealed a significant Group by Traits interaction in self-deception, (F(1, 75)=5.081, p=.027, eta-squared=.0.058), with students with Narc traits showing higher levels of self-deception compared to their counterparts with P/M traits (p=.001). The group effect was not found between Hispanic/Latino and Caucasians students (p=0.91). No significant Group by Traits interactions were found for impression management (F(1, 75)=2.342, p=.13, eta-squared=0.028), self-control (F(1, 75)=0.047, p=.828, eta-squared=0.0007) or inhibition (F(1, 75)=1.03, p=.314, eta-squared=0.014). However, individuals with Narc traits scored significantly higher on impression management and showed a faster response inhibition time compared to those with P/M traits (p=.006andp=.049, respectively).These preliminary findings could potentially expand our understanding the specific roles of psychological and neurocognitive processes in individuals with Dark Triad traits of different cultural backgrounds.