Presentation Title

Assessing Neurocognitive and Psychosocial Predictors of Schizotypal Personality Traits

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kee-Rose

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 21

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD) consists of three dimensions of symptoms, which are cognitive-perceptual deficits, interpersonal difficulties, and disorganization. Studies have demonstrated that SPD is characterized by impairments in neurocognitive processes, social interaction, and behavioral flexibility/imagination. However, the relationships between these impairments and SPD in non-clinical samples remain unclear. The current study examined the neurocognitive (i.e., impulsivity, self-control, and emotional creativity) and psychosocial predictors (i.e., academic performance, social-leisure outcome, and family relationship) of SPD symptoms in a sample of 94 university students. Participants’ schizotypal personality traits were assessed using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ-B), whereas psychosocial functioning was assessed using the Social Adjustment Scale: Self-Report. Neurocognitive processes were measured using the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Tangney Self-Control Scale, and Emotional Creativity Inventory. A series of multiple regression analyses revealed that among the neurocognitive predictors, self-control (�=0.044, t=2.732, �=.008) was a significant determinant of symptoms of interpersonal difficulties. Both impulsivity and emotional creativity were not significant predictors of the three dimensions of SPD. Among the psychosocial predictors, family relationship was the strongest predictor of cognitive-perceptual deficits symptoms (�=1.038, t=2.30, �=.024) and a trend-level predictor of interpersonal difficulties symptoms (�=0.761, t=1.683, �=.096), whereas academic performance emerged as a significant determinant of disorganized symptoms (�=1.211, t=2.704, �=.008). However, social-leisure outcome did not appear to be a significant predictor of the three dimensions of SPD. Overall, preliminary findings from this study could potentially provide new insights of the potential roles of self-control and specific aspects of psychosocial adjustment in determining SPD risk factors in healthy individuals. Our study may also serve as a precursor for further research to examine the link between neural substrates in samples of individuals with SPD tendencies.

Summary of research results to be presented

A series of multiple regression analyses revealed that among the neurocognitive predictors, self-control (�=0.044, t=2.732, �=.008) was a significant determinant of symptoms of interpersonal difficulties. Both impulsivity and emotional creativity were not significant predictors of the three dimensions of SPD. Among the psychosocial predictors, family relationship was the strongest predictor of cognitive-perceptual deficits symptoms (�=1.038, t=2.30, �=.024) and a trend-level predictor of interpersonal difficulties symptoms (�=0.761, t=1.683, �=.096), whereas academic performance emerged as a significant determinant of disorganized symptoms (�=1.211, t=2.704, �=.008). However, social-leisure outcome did not appear to be a significant predictor of the three dimensions of SPD.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Assessing Neurocognitive and Psychosocial Predictors of Schizotypal Personality Traits

CREVELING 21

Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD) consists of three dimensions of symptoms, which are cognitive-perceptual deficits, interpersonal difficulties, and disorganization. Studies have demonstrated that SPD is characterized by impairments in neurocognitive processes, social interaction, and behavioral flexibility/imagination. However, the relationships between these impairments and SPD in non-clinical samples remain unclear. The current study examined the neurocognitive (i.e., impulsivity, self-control, and emotional creativity) and psychosocial predictors (i.e., academic performance, social-leisure outcome, and family relationship) of SPD symptoms in a sample of 94 university students. Participants’ schizotypal personality traits were assessed using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ-B), whereas psychosocial functioning was assessed using the Social Adjustment Scale: Self-Report. Neurocognitive processes were measured using the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Tangney Self-Control Scale, and Emotional Creativity Inventory. A series of multiple regression analyses revealed that among the neurocognitive predictors, self-control (�=0.044, t=2.732, �=.008) was a significant determinant of symptoms of interpersonal difficulties. Both impulsivity and emotional creativity were not significant predictors of the three dimensions of SPD. Among the psychosocial predictors, family relationship was the strongest predictor of cognitive-perceptual deficits symptoms (�=1.038, t=2.30, �=.024) and a trend-level predictor of interpersonal difficulties symptoms (�=0.761, t=1.683, �=.096), whereas academic performance emerged as a significant determinant of disorganized symptoms (�=1.211, t=2.704, �=.008). However, social-leisure outcome did not appear to be a significant predictor of the three dimensions of SPD. Overall, preliminary findings from this study could potentially provide new insights of the potential roles of self-control and specific aspects of psychosocial adjustment in determining SPD risk factors in healthy individuals. Our study may also serve as a precursor for further research to examine the link between neural substrates in samples of individuals with SPD tendencies.