Presentation Title

Collective Self-Esteem as a factor effecting Depression: Latinos and Non-Latinos

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 23

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Exploring the studies of mental health with Latinos and Non-Latinos could surprise individuals because of the lack of knowledge towards it. Latinos in the United States do not seek assistance towards mental health because it is within their culture to ignore it due to familismo – meaning a strong family relationship (Mendelson, Rehkopf & Kubzansky, 2008), resulting in a higher level of depression. Collective self-esteem (CES), “is the aspect of an individual’s self-image that comes from how the individual interacts with others and groups that the individuals are a part of” (Luhtanen & Crocker, 1992). CES is expected to be high in Latino culture because of the strong background in terms of identifying themselves within their cultural groups (Chang, Natsuaki & Chen, 2013). According to Spencer-Rodgers (2006) positive CES can influence perceptions of the self and positively affect mental health especially among Latino groups. Focusing on CES we examined whether there are any significant differences between Latinos and non-Latino groups in terms of CES and depression using the data (Meyer, Dohrenwend, Schwartz, Hunter & Kertzner, 2016). The result from independent samples t-tests showed significant differences in both CES and depression scores. The Latino group showed higher depression scores as we expected; however, the Latino group displayed significantly lower CES scores. Based on the findings we hypothesized that the lower CES might affect higher depression among the Latino group. The current research will expand into the investigation of mental health issues especially among Latino groups focusing on their psychological processes including their self-identification within the Latino culture. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how to use secondary data for undergraduate research.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Collective Self-Esteem as a factor effecting Depression: Latinos and Non-Latinos

CREVELING 23

Exploring the studies of mental health with Latinos and Non-Latinos could surprise individuals because of the lack of knowledge towards it. Latinos in the United States do not seek assistance towards mental health because it is within their culture to ignore it due to familismo – meaning a strong family relationship (Mendelson, Rehkopf & Kubzansky, 2008), resulting in a higher level of depression. Collective self-esteem (CES), “is the aspect of an individual’s self-image that comes from how the individual interacts with others and groups that the individuals are a part of” (Luhtanen & Crocker, 1992). CES is expected to be high in Latino culture because of the strong background in terms of identifying themselves within their cultural groups (Chang, Natsuaki & Chen, 2013). According to Spencer-Rodgers (2006) positive CES can influence perceptions of the self and positively affect mental health especially among Latino groups. Focusing on CES we examined whether there are any significant differences between Latinos and non-Latino groups in terms of CES and depression using the data (Meyer, Dohrenwend, Schwartz, Hunter & Kertzner, 2016). The result from independent samples t-tests showed significant differences in both CES and depression scores. The Latino group showed higher depression scores as we expected; however, the Latino group displayed significantly lower CES scores. Based on the findings we hypothesized that the lower CES might affect higher depression among the Latino group. The current research will expand into the investigation of mental health issues especially among Latino groups focusing on their psychological processes including their self-identification within the Latino culture. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how to use secondary data for undergraduate research.