Presentation Title

The Impostor Phenomenon as a Predictor of Mental Health Outcomes for First-Generation College Students

Faculty Mentor

Guadalupe Bacio

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 24

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The impostor phenomenon has been conceptualized as an individual’s inability to internalize accomplishments, the fear of failure, and the attribution of success to external factors rather than internal characteristics (Chrisman et al. 1995). Previous literature has found that the impostor phenomenon is related to but is substantially discriminable from depression and social anxiety (Chrisman et al. 1995). The current study aims to further understand how gender identity and income among first-generation college students moderates the relationship between the impostor phenomenon and mental health, more specifically, anxiety and depression, using data from a study of first-year, first-generation college students at a university in Southern California. We predicted that both gender identity and income would moderate the relationship between impostor phenomenon and mental health such that self-identifying women and a lower income would strengthen the positive relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety and depression. We predict this outcome based on previous literature that shows women report higher levels of impostor phenomenon which will have a larger effect on mental health (Clance & Imes 1978, Beverly & Schwartz 2008). Furthermore, low-income students tend to report higher levels of depression and anxiety symptomatology. Moderation analysis using regression models showed that the impostor phenomenon only predicted anxiety when moderated by gender (β=0.716, p < 0.01) and income (β=1.08, p < 0.05). However, the relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety was not moderated by neither gender identity (β = -0.360) nor income (β = -0.803). Findings indicate that impostor phenomenon predicts anxiety over and above gender identity and income, two key demographic factors known to be related to anxiety. This pattern of results suggests that undergraduate services and resources for first-generation college students should prioritize signs of impostor phenomenon to effectively address mental health among this vulnerable population.

The Impostor Phenomenon as a Predictor of Mental Health Outcomes for First-Generation College Students

Authors: Yazmin Meza Lazaro1, Anayansi Alatorre Romo1, & Guadalupe A. Bacio, Ph.D.2

Institutional Affiliations: 1Department of Psychology, Pomona College; 2Departments of Psychology and Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Pomona College

The impostor phenomenon has been conceptualized as an individual’s inability to internalize accomplishments, the fear of failure, and the attribution of success to external factors rather than internal characteristics (Chrisman et al. 1995). Previous literature has found that the impostor phenomenon is related to but is substantially discriminable from depression and social anxiety (Chrisman et al. 1995). The current study aims to further understand how gender identity and income among first-generation college students moderates the relationship between the impostor phenomenon and mental health, more specifically, anxiety and depression, using data from a study of first-year, first-generation college students at a university in Southern California. We predicted that both gender identity and income would moderate the relationship between impostor phenomenon and mental health such that self-identifying women and a lower income would strengthen the positive relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety and depression. We predict this outcome based on previous literature that shows women report higher levels of impostor phenomenon which will have a larger effect on mental health (Clance & Imes 1978, Beverly & Schwartz 2008). Furthermore, low-income students tend to report higher levels of depression and anxiety symptomatology. Moderation analysis using regression models showed that the impostor phenomenon only predicted anxiety when moderated by gender (β=0.716, p < 0.01) and income (β=1.08, p < 0.05). However, the relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety was not moderated by neither gender identity (β = -0.360) nor income (β = -0.803). Findings indicate that impostor phenomenon predicts anxiety over and above gender identity and income, two key demographic factors known to be related to anxiety. This pattern of results suggests that undergraduate services and resources for first-generation college students should prioritize signs of impostor phenomenon to effectively address mental health among this vulnerable population.

Words: 292/300

Keywords:

1. Impostor phenomenon

2. First-generation college students

3. Mental health

4. Depression

5. Anxiety

6. Gender

7. Income

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Impostor Phenomenon as a Predictor of Mental Health Outcomes for First-Generation College Students

CREVELING 24

The impostor phenomenon has been conceptualized as an individual’s inability to internalize accomplishments, the fear of failure, and the attribution of success to external factors rather than internal characteristics (Chrisman et al. 1995). Previous literature has found that the impostor phenomenon is related to but is substantially discriminable from depression and social anxiety (Chrisman et al. 1995). The current study aims to further understand how gender identity and income among first-generation college students moderates the relationship between the impostor phenomenon and mental health, more specifically, anxiety and depression, using data from a study of first-year, first-generation college students at a university in Southern California. We predicted that both gender identity and income would moderate the relationship between impostor phenomenon and mental health such that self-identifying women and a lower income would strengthen the positive relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety and depression. We predict this outcome based on previous literature that shows women report higher levels of impostor phenomenon which will have a larger effect on mental health (Clance & Imes 1978, Beverly & Schwartz 2008). Furthermore, low-income students tend to report higher levels of depression and anxiety symptomatology. Moderation analysis using regression models showed that the impostor phenomenon only predicted anxiety when moderated by gender (β=0.716, p < 0.01) and income (β=1.08, p < 0.05). However, the relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety was not moderated by neither gender identity (β = -0.360) nor income (β = -0.803). Findings indicate that impostor phenomenon predicts anxiety over and above gender identity and income, two key demographic factors known to be related to anxiety. This pattern of results suggests that undergraduate services and resources for first-generation college students should prioritize signs of impostor phenomenon to effectively address mental health among this vulnerable population.

The Impostor Phenomenon as a Predictor of Mental Health Outcomes for First-Generation College Students

Authors: Yazmin Meza Lazaro1, Anayansi Alatorre Romo1, & Guadalupe A. Bacio, Ph.D.2

Institutional Affiliations: 1Department of Psychology, Pomona College; 2Departments of Psychology and Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Pomona College

The impostor phenomenon has been conceptualized as an individual’s inability to internalize accomplishments, the fear of failure, and the attribution of success to external factors rather than internal characteristics (Chrisman et al. 1995). Previous literature has found that the impostor phenomenon is related to but is substantially discriminable from depression and social anxiety (Chrisman et al. 1995). The current study aims to further understand how gender identity and income among first-generation college students moderates the relationship between the impostor phenomenon and mental health, more specifically, anxiety and depression, using data from a study of first-year, first-generation college students at a university in Southern California. We predicted that both gender identity and income would moderate the relationship between impostor phenomenon and mental health such that self-identifying women and a lower income would strengthen the positive relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety and depression. We predict this outcome based on previous literature that shows women report higher levels of impostor phenomenon which will have a larger effect on mental health (Clance & Imes 1978, Beverly & Schwartz 2008). Furthermore, low-income students tend to report higher levels of depression and anxiety symptomatology. Moderation analysis using regression models showed that the impostor phenomenon only predicted anxiety when moderated by gender (β=0.716, p < 0.01) and income (β=1.08, p < 0.05). However, the relationship between impostor phenomenon and anxiety was not moderated by neither gender identity (β = -0.360) nor income (β = -0.803). Findings indicate that impostor phenomenon predicts anxiety over and above gender identity and income, two key demographic factors known to be related to anxiety. This pattern of results suggests that undergraduate services and resources for first-generation college students should prioritize signs of impostor phenomenon to effectively address mental health among this vulnerable population.

Words: 292/300

Keywords:

1. Impostor phenomenon

2. First-generation college students

3. Mental health

4. Depression

5. Anxiety

6. Gender

7. Income