Presentation Title

Predicting Where You Will Look: The Neural Circuitry of Decision Driven Attention

Faculty Mentor

Jesse J. Bengson PhD

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 25

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Studies of the cognitive neuroscience of visual-spatial attention have almost exclusively used instructional cues, often in the form of arrows, to direct attention to relevant locations. In everyday vision however, attention is often focused volitionally, in the absence of external signals. Although investigations of cued attention comprise thousands of neuroscientific studies, remarkably few studies of attention have addressed the challenging question of how spatial attention is initiated and controlled in the absence of external instructions, which we refer to as decision-driven attention. The isolation of a neural signature that reliably reflects an internal and intentional cognitive state such as attention is a crucial first step towards building a Brain Computer Interface in which individuals can reliably and robustly control devices by controlling internal cognitive states. We present data from an experimental paradigm in which individuals’ attentional focus can be inferred via frequency specific changes in the human brain's local field potential as decisions to attend are implemented. Results indicate that the primary frequency-bands that differentially oscillate in response to binary internal decisions are in the 8-13 Hz (alpha) range recorded over the human visual cortex. This finding is crucial for the development of a reliable and generalizable brain-computer interface system that requires minimal training.

Summary of research results to be presented

There is a significant (p<.05) effect of alpha as a function of whether someone chooses to attend left or right. We have found a 65% accuracy rating in successfully predicting whether the subject was attending left or right (utilizing the alpha level data). This sets a solid precedent for future advancements utilizing our findings, as our primary goal is getting a step closer to creating a Brain Computer Interface that can assist those with physical disabilities.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Predicting Where You Will Look: The Neural Circuitry of Decision Driven Attention

CREVELING 25

Studies of the cognitive neuroscience of visual-spatial attention have almost exclusively used instructional cues, often in the form of arrows, to direct attention to relevant locations. In everyday vision however, attention is often focused volitionally, in the absence of external signals. Although investigations of cued attention comprise thousands of neuroscientific studies, remarkably few studies of attention have addressed the challenging question of how spatial attention is initiated and controlled in the absence of external instructions, which we refer to as decision-driven attention. The isolation of a neural signature that reliably reflects an internal and intentional cognitive state such as attention is a crucial first step towards building a Brain Computer Interface in which individuals can reliably and robustly control devices by controlling internal cognitive states. We present data from an experimental paradigm in which individuals’ attentional focus can be inferred via frequency specific changes in the human brain's local field potential as decisions to attend are implemented. Results indicate that the primary frequency-bands that differentially oscillate in response to binary internal decisions are in the 8-13 Hz (alpha) range recorded over the human visual cortex. This finding is crucial for the development of a reliable and generalizable brain-computer interface system that requires minimal training.