Presentation Title

Age-Related Changes in Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep

Presenter Information

Mathew BayatiFollow

Faculty Mentor

Sara Mednick, Pin-Chun Chen

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 28

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Age-Related Changes in Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep

Author: Mathew Bayati, University of California, Irvine

Mentors: Sara Mednick, PhD& Pin-Chun Chen, Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine

Studies exploring the association between the central nervous system (CNS) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity during sleep have demonstrated elevated parasympathetic tone during NREM sleep in healthy young adults, compared to waking and REM sleep. In contrast, older adults demonstrated a parasympathetic loss during NREM sleep. Recently, Naji et al. (2017) reported on a novel central/autonomic coupling event (ACE), in which spontaneous and brief increases in heart rate (HR bursts) coincide with increases in delta activity (.5-4 Hz) 5 seconds prior to the peak of the HR burst, followed by a surge in vagal activity in the 5 seconds after the HR burst. These ACE events were able to predict improvement in post-sleep memory performance to a greater degree than non-ACE sleep activity. Given aging is characterized with impaired sleep and autonomic loss, it is of interest to investigate whether and how ACE may change in aging. In the present study, we compared ACEs between younger (Ages: 18-25; N=47, F:18) and older (Ages: 60-75, N=22, F:10) adults. Subjects were administered an electroencephalographically-monitored (EEG), 90-minute nap. We examined the difference between delta activity during slow wave sleep (SWS) in frontal areas (F3, F4 channels) of the brain during 5 second intervals before HR bursts and baseline delta activity during the period of SWS without HR bursts present. We found that ACE delta activity increased for younger adults but not for older adults (Young adults: ps < 0.001; Older adults: ps > 0.76). Moreover, older adults showed less ACE and lower ACE-delta activity, compared to the younger adults (all ps < 0.001). Taken together, the current study demonstrated a significant decline of central/autonomic couplings in older adults, which might help explain the process of cognitive aging. Future research could investigate the relationship between decreased ACE and cognitive decline in older adults.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Age-Related Changes in Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep

CREVELING 28

Age-Related Changes in Central Autonomic Couplings During Sleep

Author: Mathew Bayati, University of California, Irvine

Mentors: Sara Mednick, PhD& Pin-Chun Chen, Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine

Studies exploring the association between the central nervous system (CNS) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity during sleep have demonstrated elevated parasympathetic tone during NREM sleep in healthy young adults, compared to waking and REM sleep. In contrast, older adults demonstrated a parasympathetic loss during NREM sleep. Recently, Naji et al. (2017) reported on a novel central/autonomic coupling event (ACE), in which spontaneous and brief increases in heart rate (HR bursts) coincide with increases in delta activity (.5-4 Hz) 5 seconds prior to the peak of the HR burst, followed by a surge in vagal activity in the 5 seconds after the HR burst. These ACE events were able to predict improvement in post-sleep memory performance to a greater degree than non-ACE sleep activity. Given aging is characterized with impaired sleep and autonomic loss, it is of interest to investigate whether and how ACE may change in aging. In the present study, we compared ACEs between younger (Ages: 18-25; N=47, F:18) and older (Ages: 60-75, N=22, F:10) adults. Subjects were administered an electroencephalographically-monitored (EEG), 90-minute nap. We examined the difference between delta activity during slow wave sleep (SWS) in frontal areas (F3, F4 channels) of the brain during 5 second intervals before HR bursts and baseline delta activity during the period of SWS without HR bursts present. We found that ACE delta activity increased for younger adults but not for older adults (Young adults: ps < 0.001; Older adults: ps > 0.76). Moreover, older adults showed less ACE and lower ACE-delta activity, compared to the younger adults (all ps < 0.001). Taken together, the current study demonstrated a significant decline of central/autonomic couplings in older adults, which might help explain the process of cognitive aging. Future research could investigate the relationship between decreased ACE and cognitive decline in older adults.