Presentation Title

Uptalk on Social Desirability Judgements

Faculty Mentor

Theresa Cook-Vazquez

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 29

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Uptalk is a prosodic variation in speech production wherein the interlocutor produces declarative sentences using a rising intonation structure typically reserved for interrogatives. Prior research indicates that some perceivers interpret uptalk as an indicator of uncertainty on the part of the speaker. However, this prosodic element may also serve to facilitate rapport for the speaker. The current study investigates the influence of uptalk on social desirability judgements. We audiovisually recorded four actors (two male and two female) reading scripts as if they were answering questions in a job interview. Actors produced these scripts using both uptalk and typical declarative prosodic structure. Participants evaluated the social desirability of the “job candidates” on a variety of previously validated scales. The experiment was fully counterbalanced such that no participant saw the same actor using both uptalk and typical declarative prosody. We predict that participants will evaluate actors using uptalk as both less competent and more likeable than actors using typical declarative prosody. For situations in which people seek to manage their social image, these results may indicate that we trade evaluations of competency for those of likeability.

Summary of research results to be presented

The data is currently preliminary and will be updated once analyzed.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Uptalk on Social Desirability Judgements

CREVELING 29

Uptalk is a prosodic variation in speech production wherein the interlocutor produces declarative sentences using a rising intonation structure typically reserved for interrogatives. Prior research indicates that some perceivers interpret uptalk as an indicator of uncertainty on the part of the speaker. However, this prosodic element may also serve to facilitate rapport for the speaker. The current study investigates the influence of uptalk on social desirability judgements. We audiovisually recorded four actors (two male and two female) reading scripts as if they were answering questions in a job interview. Actors produced these scripts using both uptalk and typical declarative prosodic structure. Participants evaluated the social desirability of the “job candidates” on a variety of previously validated scales. The experiment was fully counterbalanced such that no participant saw the same actor using both uptalk and typical declarative prosody. We predict that participants will evaluate actors using uptalk as both less competent and more likeable than actors using typical declarative prosody. For situations in which people seek to manage their social image, these results may indicate that we trade evaluations of competency for those of likeability.