Presentation Title

Fear of Police Brutality Among Americans of Various Demographics

Presenter Information

Kevin O'ConnorFollow

Faculty Mentor

N/A

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 3

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Friend or foe? This is the question millions of Americans are asking. This study relies on data from Chapman University’s American Fear Survey, which examines the data in relation to the question, “How afraid are you of police brutality in the United States?” I sought to determine if there is a correlation between people in the United States’ fear of police brutality and demographic factors including race, gender, region in which respondents of the survey live, and political allegiance. Citizens of the United States all have fears. One of those fears that continue to proliferate is the issue of police brutality. This issue stems from centuries of racial prejudices of minorities, in particular, African American males. The issue has become increasingly covered by the media and, as a result, has made the issue a common topic across the nation. By conducting this research, I aimed to identify population groups in the United States who do and do not fear police violence. My goal was to contribute to the scientific community by shedding light onto the historical injustices that have occurred in the United States against racial minorities and show how these injustices continue to plague race relations in this country. Researchers have identified several theories that may contribute to this issue of police brutality, one of which is critical race theory and the social construct of race as a hierarchical structure. In my research, one of my findings is that racial minorities have a higher level of fear in regards to police brutality than ethnic majorities. This finding has important implications for race relations in the United States.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Fear of Police Brutality Among Americans of Various Demographics

CREVELING 3

Friend or foe? This is the question millions of Americans are asking. This study relies on data from Chapman University’s American Fear Survey, which examines the data in relation to the question, “How afraid are you of police brutality in the United States?” I sought to determine if there is a correlation between people in the United States’ fear of police brutality and demographic factors including race, gender, region in which respondents of the survey live, and political allegiance. Citizens of the United States all have fears. One of those fears that continue to proliferate is the issue of police brutality. This issue stems from centuries of racial prejudices of minorities, in particular, African American males. The issue has become increasingly covered by the media and, as a result, has made the issue a common topic across the nation. By conducting this research, I aimed to identify population groups in the United States who do and do not fear police violence. My goal was to contribute to the scientific community by shedding light onto the historical injustices that have occurred in the United States against racial minorities and show how these injustices continue to plague race relations in this country. Researchers have identified several theories that may contribute to this issue of police brutality, one of which is critical race theory and the social construct of race as a hierarchical structure. In my research, one of my findings is that racial minorities have a higher level of fear in regards to police brutality than ethnic majorities. This finding has important implications for race relations in the United States.