Presentation Title

Predicting executive functions from physical, social, and mental activities in older adults over 50

Faculty Mentor

Lee Ryan

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 30

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Executive functions (EFs) are an essential aspect of cognition. EFs are described as a set of abilities which allow individuals to control information. The unity and diversity of EFs separate EFs into updating, shifting, and inhibition subcomponents. Extensive research argues that with age some cognitive abilities deteriorate. To counteract this process, researchers have highlighted the potential benefits of engaging in activities (i.e., physical, social, and mental activities) as one ages. This study examined which of the activities would be the best predictor of EF subcomponents and EFs in general. Furthermore, considering how nearly one-third of all adults are being diagnosed with hypertension, this research will explore the impact of this on executive functioning abilities. Fifty-six healthy older adults (Range = 50-80 years, M = 69.2, SD = 6.67) from the community were administered cognitive tests and a questionnaire to measure the frequency at which they engage in activities. Fifteen of the participants were hypertensive. The current study hypothesized that each activity would have a unique relationship with the EFs subcomponents and general EF. However, the findings indicated there was no significant relationship between the activities and EF subcomponents. Instead, the results indicated that age was highly predictive of general EF and updating EF. For both models, as age increased, general and updating EF performance decreased. In addition, hypertension status was a significant predictor of general EF, such that those with hypertension had poorer general EF in comparison to normotensive individuals with higher general EF.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Predicting executive functions from physical, social, and mental activities in older adults over 50

CREVELING 30

Executive functions (EFs) are an essential aspect of cognition. EFs are described as a set of abilities which allow individuals to control information. The unity and diversity of EFs separate EFs into updating, shifting, and inhibition subcomponents. Extensive research argues that with age some cognitive abilities deteriorate. To counteract this process, researchers have highlighted the potential benefits of engaging in activities (i.e., physical, social, and mental activities) as one ages. This study examined which of the activities would be the best predictor of EF subcomponents and EFs in general. Furthermore, considering how nearly one-third of all adults are being diagnosed with hypertension, this research will explore the impact of this on executive functioning abilities. Fifty-six healthy older adults (Range = 50-80 years, M = 69.2, SD = 6.67) from the community were administered cognitive tests and a questionnaire to measure the frequency at which they engage in activities. Fifteen of the participants were hypertensive. The current study hypothesized that each activity would have a unique relationship with the EFs subcomponents and general EF. However, the findings indicated there was no significant relationship between the activities and EF subcomponents. Instead, the results indicated that age was highly predictive of general EF and updating EF. For both models, as age increased, general and updating EF performance decreased. In addition, hypertension status was a significant predictor of general EF, such that those with hypertension had poorer general EF in comparison to normotensive individuals with higher general EF.