Presentation Title

UVB Avoidance Over Time by Juvenile Dendrobates Azerues

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lee Kats

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 11

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Amphibians are harmed by UV rays, as they have a thin that makes them susceptible to cancers. However, most amphibians combat this by being nocturnal, except dart frogs which are an exclusively diurnal species. Previous studies have shown that both the larval and adult stages of Dendrobates azureusavoid UV light far more than species of nocturnal frogs. The goal of this experiment was to see if the juvenile frogs of D. azereuswould distinguish between UV light and visible light, and avoid UV light more than a nocturnal frog species (Pseudacris regilla). The two species of juvenile frogs were kept individually in 10 gallon glass aquariums half covered with a UV eliminating Mylar sheet and were exposed to two lighting conditions, UV light and visible light. Each trial lasted 15 minutes and the amount of time the frog spent exposing itself to the lighting condition as well as behavior displays were recorded every minute. The results showed that both species of frogs exposed themselves less to UV light as time went on and exposed them selves more to visible light as time went on. The data also showed the D.azureusexposed its self significantly less to the UV light than P. regilla. In conclusion, the experiment showed that juvenile frogs can distinguish and react differently to UV light, and that juvenile dart frogs avoid UV light more than a nocturnal frog species.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

UVB Avoidance Over Time by Juvenile Dendrobates Azerues

CREVELING 11

Amphibians are harmed by UV rays, as they have a thin that makes them susceptible to cancers. However, most amphibians combat this by being nocturnal, except dart frogs which are an exclusively diurnal species. Previous studies have shown that both the larval and adult stages of Dendrobates azureusavoid UV light far more than species of nocturnal frogs. The goal of this experiment was to see if the juvenile frogs of D. azereuswould distinguish between UV light and visible light, and avoid UV light more than a nocturnal frog species (Pseudacris regilla). The two species of juvenile frogs were kept individually in 10 gallon glass aquariums half covered with a UV eliminating Mylar sheet and were exposed to two lighting conditions, UV light and visible light. Each trial lasted 15 minutes and the amount of time the frog spent exposing itself to the lighting condition as well as behavior displays were recorded every minute. The results showed that both species of frogs exposed themselves less to UV light as time went on and exposed them selves more to visible light as time went on. The data also showed the D.azureusexposed its self significantly less to the UV light than P. regilla. In conclusion, the experiment showed that juvenile frogs can distinguish and react differently to UV light, and that juvenile dart frogs avoid UV light more than a nocturnal frog species.