Presentation Title

Changing characteristics of Ventura County’s veteran population from 2000 to 2016

Presenter Information

Melanie HouseFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Luis A. Sánchez

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 36

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The veteran population in the United States is ever changing and represents a microcosm of U.S. society as a whole. Located just north of Los Angeles, Ventura County has a population of just under 850,000. The county is home to nearly 50,000 veterans. My research examines changing characteristics of the county’s young veteran population from 2000 to 2016. This study analyzes veterans and other civilians ages 25 to 44 years old. I utilize individual-level from the 2000 U.S. Census and 2012-2016 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). In this exploratory study, I analyze shifts related to the social, demographic, and economic characteristics among Ventura County’s veteran population. In particular, I compare trends between male and female veterans, and between veterans across racial-ethnic groups. I also examine homeownership rates, marital status, and educational attainment among veterans in Ventura County. Comparing between 2000 and 2016 will give a better understanding of how the veteran community is changing across time but also digs deeper into aspects that may vary by gender and race and ethnicity. For example, I find that in 2000 white veterans were nearly twice as likely than Latino ones to have a bachelor’s degree (22.2% vs. 11.0%, respectively) but by 2016 the gap had closed to a 5% difference (whites = 30.2% vs. Latinos=24.7%). This research is important to help identify housing needs in county with high cost of living, as well as policies that are attuned to an increasingly diverse veteran population. While the young veteran population in Ventura County appears to be different than the young civilian population of the county as a whole, I identify the specific differences in hopes to encourage fair and equitable support that meets the unique challenges and future demands of these local veterans.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Changing characteristics of Ventura County’s veteran population from 2000 to 2016

CREVELING 36

The veteran population in the United States is ever changing and represents a microcosm of U.S. society as a whole. Located just north of Los Angeles, Ventura County has a population of just under 850,000. The county is home to nearly 50,000 veterans. My research examines changing characteristics of the county’s young veteran population from 2000 to 2016. This study analyzes veterans and other civilians ages 25 to 44 years old. I utilize individual-level from the 2000 U.S. Census and 2012-2016 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). In this exploratory study, I analyze shifts related to the social, demographic, and economic characteristics among Ventura County’s veteran population. In particular, I compare trends between male and female veterans, and between veterans across racial-ethnic groups. I also examine homeownership rates, marital status, and educational attainment among veterans in Ventura County. Comparing between 2000 and 2016 will give a better understanding of how the veteran community is changing across time but also digs deeper into aspects that may vary by gender and race and ethnicity. For example, I find that in 2000 white veterans were nearly twice as likely than Latino ones to have a bachelor’s degree (22.2% vs. 11.0%, respectively) but by 2016 the gap had closed to a 5% difference (whites = 30.2% vs. Latinos=24.7%). This research is important to help identify housing needs in county with high cost of living, as well as policies that are attuned to an increasingly diverse veteran population. While the young veteran population in Ventura County appears to be different than the young civilian population of the county as a whole, I identify the specific differences in hopes to encourage fair and equitable support that meets the unique challenges and future demands of these local veterans.