Presentation Title

Familiar Places with New Faces: Emerging Latino Enclaves in Established Areas

Faculty Mentor

Luis Sanchez

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 38

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This study uses spatial analysis to examine emerging patterns of Latino neighborhoods and enclaves in Los Angeles County from 1990 to 2016. In particular, the spatial distribution of Latino neighborhood clusters and the social, economic, and demographic characteristics associated with them are investigated. This research is significant because although Los Angeles County is a traditional Latino settlement destination, many Latinos have moved to “new” areas. Census tract-level data is extracted from the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Decennial Census and the 2012-2016 American Community Surveys (5-year estimates). Spatial statistics, such as the Global Moran’s I and Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA), measure changes in Latinos’ geographic concentration and identify neighborhood clusters in 1990, 2000, and 2016. The changing patterns of Latino enclaves that have emerged in recent years that were not present in the previous decades, along with the persistence of established Latino neighborhoods throughout the decades of the study are another focal point of interest.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Familiar Places with New Faces: Emerging Latino Enclaves in Established Areas

CREVELING 38

This study uses spatial analysis to examine emerging patterns of Latino neighborhoods and enclaves in Los Angeles County from 1990 to 2016. In particular, the spatial distribution of Latino neighborhood clusters and the social, economic, and demographic characteristics associated with them are investigated. This research is significant because although Los Angeles County is a traditional Latino settlement destination, many Latinos have moved to “new” areas. Census tract-level data is extracted from the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Decennial Census and the 2012-2016 American Community Surveys (5-year estimates). Spatial statistics, such as the Global Moran’s I and Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA), measure changes in Latinos’ geographic concentration and identify neighborhood clusters in 1990, 2000, and 2016. The changing patterns of Latino enclaves that have emerged in recent years that were not present in the previous decades, along with the persistence of established Latino neighborhoods throughout the decades of the study are another focal point of interest.