Presentation Title

Growing up Mayan: Children’s Prosocial development in cultural context

Faculty Mentor

Lucia Alcala

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 39

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Children’s daily activities vary significantly by culture. This study examined children’s everyday activities in two Mayan communities in Yucatan, México and explored their views, contributions, and conceptions on children’s roles in family work and community activities. We used semi-structured interviews to ask our participants (N = 38, ages 7 to 12) about their contributions to household work and community activities. Preliminary results revealed that all of our participants reported helping substantially by cooking for the family, washing their clothes, tending siblings and fetching firewood. Children highlighted the importance of shared responsibilities as responsible family members, and expressed positive feelings about their roles within these contexts. Most participants reported helping when they notice help was needed or to relief others from work. At home, the majority of children reported carrying out prosocial behaviors largely on their own initiative (85%). We also asked participants whether they believe children should be paid for helping or not. Most participants said that helping is part of their family responsibility and only three participants believed children should get paid for household work. Children also reported helping with multiple community events during rituals or other community celebrations. In general, children viewed work as crucial for their development, and work was not viewed as harmful or undesirable. Our findings shed light on the importance of taking into account children’s perspectives and cultural values when working with children from diverse communities, particularly indigenous communities.

Keywords: Mayan communities; children’s roles; community activities; prosocial behavior; family responsibilities

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Growing up Mayan: Children’s Prosocial development in cultural context

CREVELING 39

Children’s daily activities vary significantly by culture. This study examined children’s everyday activities in two Mayan communities in Yucatan, México and explored their views, contributions, and conceptions on children’s roles in family work and community activities. We used semi-structured interviews to ask our participants (N = 38, ages 7 to 12) about their contributions to household work and community activities. Preliminary results revealed that all of our participants reported helping substantially by cooking for the family, washing their clothes, tending siblings and fetching firewood. Children highlighted the importance of shared responsibilities as responsible family members, and expressed positive feelings about their roles within these contexts. Most participants reported helping when they notice help was needed or to relief others from work. At home, the majority of children reported carrying out prosocial behaviors largely on their own initiative (85%). We also asked participants whether they believe children should be paid for helping or not. Most participants said that helping is part of their family responsibility and only three participants believed children should get paid for household work. Children also reported helping with multiple community events during rituals or other community celebrations. In general, children viewed work as crucial for their development, and work was not viewed as harmful or undesirable. Our findings shed light on the importance of taking into account children’s perspectives and cultural values when working with children from diverse communities, particularly indigenous communities.

Keywords: Mayan communities; children’s roles; community activities; prosocial behavior; family responsibilities