Presentation Title

Making a Political World: The Overton Window, World-Building, and the Driving Forces Behind Voter Decision-Making

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Adam Francisco

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 4

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The election of Donald Trump to the presidency in 2016 was a shock to many. The upset led pundits and analysts to offer a variety of explanations involving voter demographics or other traditional methods of election analysis. However, while these propositions explain how Trump won, they do not explain why. For that, one must dig deeper into the underlying reasons for human decision-making and world-building. Such is the case not just for the 2016 election--that is just one example--but for democratic elections and societal change in general. Foundational to this is the theory of the Overton Window, which posits a window of possibilities to explain changes in public policy. Furthermore, it proposes that political change is always preceded by cultural and societal change. Using this concept as a baseline, one can see that humanity’s creative ability to produce culture and society applies to politics as well. The Overton Window serves as a visualization of the political world that the American people have created through consistent nurturing of perceptions and cultivation of political views via conversation and campaigning.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Making a Political World: The Overton Window, World-Building, and the Driving Forces Behind Voter Decision-Making

CREVELING 4

The election of Donald Trump to the presidency in 2016 was a shock to many. The upset led pundits and analysts to offer a variety of explanations involving voter demographics or other traditional methods of election analysis. However, while these propositions explain how Trump won, they do not explain why. For that, one must dig deeper into the underlying reasons for human decision-making and world-building. Such is the case not just for the 2016 election--that is just one example--but for democratic elections and societal change in general. Foundational to this is the theory of the Overton Window, which posits a window of possibilities to explain changes in public policy. Furthermore, it proposes that political change is always preceded by cultural and societal change. Using this concept as a baseline, one can see that humanity’s creative ability to produce culture and society applies to politics as well. The Overton Window serves as a visualization of the political world that the American people have created through consistent nurturing of perceptions and cultivation of political views via conversation and campaigning.