Presentation Title

Loneliness and Coping Among Emerging Adults in College

Faculty Mentor

Andrea Hopmeyer

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 41

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Feeling lonely is a common experience among emerging adults in college. The present study examined loneliness coping strategies in a sample of 339 students (M=19.93, SD=1.34; 252 females, 97 males) from a small liberal arts college. The results showed that the coping strategies were best represented by 6 underlying dimensions—positive coping, support coping, avoidance coping, substance use coping, humor coping and religion coping. The results also showed that students' coping strategies varied as a function of gender and race/ethnicity. While females scored higher than males on support and avoidance coping, males scored higher than females on humor and religion coping. Caucasians were more likely than students of color to use substance use and humor coping. On the other hand, students of color were more likely than Caucasian students to use positive, support, and religion coping. These findings underscore that programs designed to help students adjust to emotional challenges of college need to take gender and race/ethnicity into account.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Loneliness and Coping Among Emerging Adults in College

CREVELING 41

Feeling lonely is a common experience among emerging adults in college. The present study examined loneliness coping strategies in a sample of 339 students (M=19.93, SD=1.34; 252 females, 97 males) from a small liberal arts college. The results showed that the coping strategies were best represented by 6 underlying dimensions—positive coping, support coping, avoidance coping, substance use coping, humor coping and religion coping. The results also showed that students' coping strategies varied as a function of gender and race/ethnicity. While females scored higher than males on support and avoidance coping, males scored higher than females on humor and religion coping. Caucasians were more likely than students of color to use substance use and humor coping. On the other hand, students of color were more likely than Caucasian students to use positive, support, and religion coping. These findings underscore that programs designed to help students adjust to emotional challenges of college need to take gender and race/ethnicity into account.