Presentation Title

The Impact of Body Satisfaction and Parental Involvement on Child Bullying

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 43

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

At least one out of every five students reports being bullied. (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016). There is plenty of research on the variables that predict bullying victimization. However, there is not much research on what variables predict why children bully each other. Schell-Busey, Connell, and Kahle (2017) found that body image was indeed a predictor for bullying. A person’s body satisfaction is not the only thing that can impact why children bully each other. Flouri and Buchanan (2003) found that parent involvement is associated with less bullying behavior. Expanding on previous studies, the current research investigated whether body satisfaction and parental involvement affected how often a child bullies others by using data from Health Behavior in School Aged Children (Ronald, 2009-2010). The results from the multiple regression analysis found that both body satisfaction and parental involvement significantly predict how often a child bullies others. The current results inform us of some potential variables explaining bullying, which allows future research to look at potential areas at in order to prevent children from bullying others. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data can facilitate undergraduate research.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Impact of Body Satisfaction and Parental Involvement on Child Bullying

CREVELING 43

At least one out of every five students reports being bullied. (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016). There is plenty of research on the variables that predict bullying victimization. However, there is not much research on what variables predict why children bully each other. Schell-Busey, Connell, and Kahle (2017) found that body image was indeed a predictor for bullying. A person’s body satisfaction is not the only thing that can impact why children bully each other. Flouri and Buchanan (2003) found that parent involvement is associated with less bullying behavior. Expanding on previous studies, the current research investigated whether body satisfaction and parental involvement affected how often a child bullies others by using data from Health Behavior in School Aged Children (Ronald, 2009-2010). The results from the multiple regression analysis found that both body satisfaction and parental involvement significantly predict how often a child bullies others. The current results inform us of some potential variables explaining bullying, which allows future research to look at potential areas at in order to prevent children from bullying others. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will provide information about how secondary data can facilitate undergraduate research.