Presentation Title

US Protectionism and the Rise of Blockchain Tech in Europe

Presenter Information

Sarah MosleyFollow

Faculty Mentor

Jesse Mora

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 45

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

On June 1st, 2018, Donald Trump made a historic announcement: the US will impose tariffs on steel (25%) and aluminum (10%) imports from 3 destination markets: Canada, Mexico and the EU. This decision follows a growing “America First” movement, championed by the current president, which aims to protect domestic workers, particularly in manufacturing sectors, from international competition. This summer, I travelled to Geneva, Switzerland and London, UK to research and investigate the impacts of recent US protectionist trade policies in the Europe region. My research was conducted through literature research and interviews with financial professionals, fund managers, firm representatives, and members of international organizations including: the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). In this paper, I argue that the main impacts of US protectionism in Europe are: 1) foreign retrenchment among large, incumbent, multinational European firms, 2) an increase in free trade deals with countries outside of the US, 3) investor demand for alternative investment funds and non-traditional asset classes (including “crypto funds,”), and 4) growth in the European fintech and blockchain tech ecosystem. However, because the US’s protectionist trade policies are so recent, it is important to note that most long-term impacts are not yet observable in firm behavior in Europe.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

US Protectionism and the Rise of Blockchain Tech in Europe

CREVELING 45

On June 1st, 2018, Donald Trump made a historic announcement: the US will impose tariffs on steel (25%) and aluminum (10%) imports from 3 destination markets: Canada, Mexico and the EU. This decision follows a growing “America First” movement, championed by the current president, which aims to protect domestic workers, particularly in manufacturing sectors, from international competition. This summer, I travelled to Geneva, Switzerland and London, UK to research and investigate the impacts of recent US protectionist trade policies in the Europe region. My research was conducted through literature research and interviews with financial professionals, fund managers, firm representatives, and members of international organizations including: the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). In this paper, I argue that the main impacts of US protectionism in Europe are: 1) foreign retrenchment among large, incumbent, multinational European firms, 2) an increase in free trade deals with countries outside of the US, 3) investor demand for alternative investment funds and non-traditional asset classes (including “crypto funds,”), and 4) growth in the European fintech and blockchain tech ecosystem. However, because the US’s protectionist trade policies are so recent, it is important to note that most long-term impacts are not yet observable in firm behavior in Europe.