Presentation Title

Prediction of Adolescents’ Drug Consumption based on Their Race and Self-awareness

Faculty Mentor

Dr. HyeSun Lee, Dr. Weldon Smith

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 58

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Drug consumption continues to raise significant concerns in young generations, especially in younger adolescents. Elekes, Miller, Chomynova, and Beck (2009) emphasize the strong correlation between perceptions of the risks of drugs and drug prevalence in adolescents. In addition, prior research indicated a higher use of substances in connection with awareness of the risks of drugs (Elekes et al., 2009). Literature also directs attention to differences in drug use of several race/ethnicities. Results revealed Whites as more likely to consume alcohol and displayed Black-Asians with higher use of marijuana (Clark, Nguyen, & Kropko, 2013). Focusing on drug consumption, we examined whether the race and self-awareness of young adolescents can predict drug consumption. 9th graders data from Development and Malleability from Childhood to Adulthood in Baltimore, Maryland, 2001-2005 (Lalongo, 2001-2005) were used for the investigation. The multiple regression analysis results showed that both race and self-awareness were significant predictors of drug consumption. Based on the results, Whites are more likely to consume drugs than Blacks, while the effect of self-awareness is held constant. Regarding self-awareness, the more aware adolescents are of the dangers of drugs, the less likely they are to consume drugs. Based on the findings, the current research can expand the focus to drug use prevalence rates among youth of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and sociocultural factors (e.g., discrimination, cultural identity, family structure, religious beliefs) that may influence drug use at a young age. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Prediction of Adolescents’ Drug Consumption based on Their Race and Self-awareness

CREVELING 58

Drug consumption continues to raise significant concerns in young generations, especially in younger adolescents. Elekes, Miller, Chomynova, and Beck (2009) emphasize the strong correlation between perceptions of the risks of drugs and drug prevalence in adolescents. In addition, prior research indicated a higher use of substances in connection with awareness of the risks of drugs (Elekes et al., 2009). Literature also directs attention to differences in drug use of several race/ethnicities. Results revealed Whites as more likely to consume alcohol and displayed Black-Asians with higher use of marijuana (Clark, Nguyen, & Kropko, 2013). Focusing on drug consumption, we examined whether the race and self-awareness of young adolescents can predict drug consumption. 9th graders data from Development and Malleability from Childhood to Adulthood in Baltimore, Maryland, 2001-2005 (Lalongo, 2001-2005) were used for the investigation. The multiple regression analysis results showed that both race and self-awareness were significant predictors of drug consumption. Based on the results, Whites are more likely to consume drugs than Blacks, while the effect of self-awareness is held constant. Regarding self-awareness, the more aware adolescents are of the dangers of drugs, the less likely they are to consume drugs. Based on the findings, the current research can expand the focus to drug use prevalence rates among youth of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and sociocultural factors (e.g., discrimination, cultural identity, family structure, religious beliefs) that may influence drug use at a young age. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.