Presentation Title

The influence of personality traits on gender differences in perceived workplace discrimination

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Weldon Smith, Dr. HyeSun Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 60

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Workplace discrimination is an adversity that many employees face. According to Dhanani, Beus, and Joseph (2018), perceived workplace discrimination is defined as an employee’s perception of negative and unfair treatment based on one’s association with a social group. Workplace discrimination is a young and growing field. Past studies have focused on how different psychiatric diagnosis influenced the association of experienced workplace discrimination. Yoshimura, Bakolis, and Henderson, (2018) found that no one specific disorder was associated with higher levels of experienced discrimination. Parkins, Fishbein, and Ritchey (2006) focused on how personality traits influenced one’s discriminatory feelings and bullying behavior towards others in the workplace. Their findings showed that individuals likely to engage in discrimination are those who scored high on authoritarian and social dominance orientation scales, but research did not focus on those being discriminated against. Studies regarding the relationship between high and low levels of the Big 5 personality traits to gender differences in perceived workplace discrimination, has not been explored. Focusing on factors that contribute to workplace discrimination, I investigate this relationship by using data from the Professional Worker Career Experience Survey-United States (Rosenbloom & Ash, 2004). Results from two-way ANOVA analyses utilizing gender and high/low personality traits as factors showed significant differences between genders on workplace discrimination. All Big 5 traits besides extroversion too showed significant differences between high and low levels. A significant interaction was found between agreeableness and gender showing that females with low agreeableness experienced higher levels of workplace discrimination. Based on these findings, this research will contribute to the growing field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and help employers make non-discriminatory decisions with less bias by considering personality factors. In addition to the research findings, the presentations will provide further information on how secondary data analyses can aid in undergraduate research.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The influence of personality traits on gender differences in perceived workplace discrimination

CREVELING 60

Workplace discrimination is an adversity that many employees face. According to Dhanani, Beus, and Joseph (2018), perceived workplace discrimination is defined as an employee’s perception of negative and unfair treatment based on one’s association with a social group. Workplace discrimination is a young and growing field. Past studies have focused on how different psychiatric diagnosis influenced the association of experienced workplace discrimination. Yoshimura, Bakolis, and Henderson, (2018) found that no one specific disorder was associated with higher levels of experienced discrimination. Parkins, Fishbein, and Ritchey (2006) focused on how personality traits influenced one’s discriminatory feelings and bullying behavior towards others in the workplace. Their findings showed that individuals likely to engage in discrimination are those who scored high on authoritarian and social dominance orientation scales, but research did not focus on those being discriminated against. Studies regarding the relationship between high and low levels of the Big 5 personality traits to gender differences in perceived workplace discrimination, has not been explored. Focusing on factors that contribute to workplace discrimination, I investigate this relationship by using data from the Professional Worker Career Experience Survey-United States (Rosenbloom & Ash, 2004). Results from two-way ANOVA analyses utilizing gender and high/low personality traits as factors showed significant differences between genders on workplace discrimination. All Big 5 traits besides extroversion too showed significant differences between high and low levels. A significant interaction was found between agreeableness and gender showing that females with low agreeableness experienced higher levels of workplace discrimination. Based on these findings, this research will contribute to the growing field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and help employers make non-discriminatory decisions with less bias by considering personality factors. In addition to the research findings, the presentations will provide further information on how secondary data analyses can aid in undergraduate research.