Presentation Title

Discovering the Roots of Identity in the Black British Community

Faculty Mentor

Chis McMillan

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 61

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This study aims to explore the question of identity of those that identify as black in London, England. Blackness has been used as a universal term where who is ‘black’ has been reduced to the definition governed by skin pigmentation. Usually in white majority societies such as the United States and European countries such as England, people who are identified as ‘black’ are those with original African heritage, including individuals belonging to the expanse of the African Diaspora. This knowledge alone is what makes the term black limiting as it assumes a homogenous culture within itself. This study takes place in London, England because it is a multicultural city where several identities are encouraged to be developed. Thus, the study investigates what it means to identify as black while also belonging to a sub identity such as British, English and so on, and more importantly how they derive at this conclusion. Through interviews with several Londoners who themselves identify as black, questions such as “who or what do you consider is black”, “why do you consider yourself black” and “what is blackness here in London/UK” are entertained to understand how blackness is currently understood and how it can eventually be re-understood. Ultimately the goal, is to begin to realize blackness not as the concept that it holds today, but to open up a discussion on how it can be redefined to reflect a more useful definition.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Discovering the Roots of Identity in the Black British Community

CREVELING 61

This study aims to explore the question of identity of those that identify as black in London, England. Blackness has been used as a universal term where who is ‘black’ has been reduced to the definition governed by skin pigmentation. Usually in white majority societies such as the United States and European countries such as England, people who are identified as ‘black’ are those with original African heritage, including individuals belonging to the expanse of the African Diaspora. This knowledge alone is what makes the term black limiting as it assumes a homogenous culture within itself. This study takes place in London, England because it is a multicultural city where several identities are encouraged to be developed. Thus, the study investigates what it means to identify as black while also belonging to a sub identity such as British, English and so on, and more importantly how they derive at this conclusion. Through interviews with several Londoners who themselves identify as black, questions such as “who or what do you consider is black”, “why do you consider yourself black” and “what is blackness here in London/UK” are entertained to understand how blackness is currently understood and how it can eventually be re-understood. Ultimately the goal, is to begin to realize blackness not as the concept that it holds today, but to open up a discussion on how it can be redefined to reflect a more useful definition.