Presentation Title

How Male and Female Athletes differ in Sport Anxiety

Faculty Mentor

Magan D. Granquist

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 62

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Abstract

Content:

One of coaches’ primary objectives is to provide effective physical training that improves their swimmers’ overall performance (Tobar, 2012). Not only will physical training improve performance, but a swimmer’s state of mind influences their performance as well. It is important for coaches to know how male and female athletes may differ in sport anxiety so that they may be able to help their athletes more effectively cope with sport anxiety.

Objective:

This research examines differences in sport anxiety between male and female athletes.

Setting:

NCAA Division III collegiate institution.

Data collection:

This study used Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved archival data collected by Dr. Granquist.

Participants:

Ninety student athletes (49 males, 41 females), average age 19.6 years old (range 18 and 24).

Variables:

Gender (male and female) and Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2, Smith, Smoll, Cumming, & Grossbard, 2006).

Results:

SAS-2 mean scores for males were 24.82 (SD = 7.40) and females were 25.22 (SD = 7.90). There was not a statistically significant difference in SAS-2 between males and females (t = -.250 (88), p = .804).

Conclusion:

While not statistically significant, females reported greater anxiety than males. Results of this study do not specifically address sport anxiety in competitive swimmers but provide results for athletes in general. More research is need for competitive swimmers.

Summary of research results to be presented

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

How Male and Female Athletes differ in Sport Anxiety

CREVELING 62

Abstract

Content:

One of coaches’ primary objectives is to provide effective physical training that improves their swimmers’ overall performance (Tobar, 2012). Not only will physical training improve performance, but a swimmer’s state of mind influences their performance as well. It is important for coaches to know how male and female athletes may differ in sport anxiety so that they may be able to help their athletes more effectively cope with sport anxiety.

Objective:

This research examines differences in sport anxiety between male and female athletes.

Setting:

NCAA Division III collegiate institution.

Data collection:

This study used Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved archival data collected by Dr. Granquist.

Participants:

Ninety student athletes (49 males, 41 females), average age 19.6 years old (range 18 and 24).

Variables:

Gender (male and female) and Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2, Smith, Smoll, Cumming, & Grossbard, 2006).

Results:

SAS-2 mean scores for males were 24.82 (SD = 7.40) and females were 25.22 (SD = 7.90). There was not a statistically significant difference in SAS-2 between males and females (t = -.250 (88), p = .804).

Conclusion:

While not statistically significant, females reported greater anxiety than males. Results of this study do not specifically address sport anxiety in competitive swimmers but provide results for athletes in general. More research is need for competitive swimmers.