Presentation Title

Do distinctly located Caenorhabditis worm strains from various geographical locations show differences in sensory-dependent decision-making behaviors? Different places, different decisions made!

Faculty Mentor

Gareth Harris

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 14

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Variation in animal’s behavior across populations of all types of organisms has been an area of study across nematodes of various species (De Bono and Bargmann, 1998; Bendesky et al., 2011; Scott et al., 2018). Despite the appreciation of variation in behavioral strategies across natural isolates, the mechanisms that make each behavior distinct from organism to organism is still not clear. My project uses a combination of genetics and behavioral analysis to understand how sensory-dependent behavioral strategies vary across different species of the Caenorhabditis nematode. This question will specifically address how different natural isolates of both C. elegans strains and other Caenorhabditis strains respond in various decision-making/sensory behavioral paradigms. My goal was to identify differences in behavioral strategies to attractive and dangerous sensory stimuli across nematodes originating from distinct environments previously isolated from areas across the globe. In Dr. Harris’s laboratory, I have specifically examined strains originated from all over the world that are available to determine the ability to perform chemosensory behaviors and multi-sensory dependent decision-making behaviors. Distinct natural isolates have been examined across a behavioral paradigm where worms are challenged with both food and danger cues and their escape and food leaving behavior will be assessed. Preliminary results suggest different strains of nematode perform multi-sensory behaviors differently. I will continue to test a variety of natural isolates for their ability to perform multi-sensory behavior and overall identify potential differences in behavioral preference across various natural isolates of nematodes.

(Key Words: C. elegans, Caenorhabditis, Behavior, Sensory-dependent, Natural Isolates, Multi-sensory, Chemosensory, Nematodes)

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Do distinctly located Caenorhabditis worm strains from various geographical locations show differences in sensory-dependent decision-making behaviors? Different places, different decisions made!

CREVELING 14

Variation in animal’s behavior across populations of all types of organisms has been an area of study across nematodes of various species (De Bono and Bargmann, 1998; Bendesky et al., 2011; Scott et al., 2018). Despite the appreciation of variation in behavioral strategies across natural isolates, the mechanisms that make each behavior distinct from organism to organism is still not clear. My project uses a combination of genetics and behavioral analysis to understand how sensory-dependent behavioral strategies vary across different species of the Caenorhabditis nematode. This question will specifically address how different natural isolates of both C. elegans strains and other Caenorhabditis strains respond in various decision-making/sensory behavioral paradigms. My goal was to identify differences in behavioral strategies to attractive and dangerous sensory stimuli across nematodes originating from distinct environments previously isolated from areas across the globe. In Dr. Harris’s laboratory, I have specifically examined strains originated from all over the world that are available to determine the ability to perform chemosensory behaviors and multi-sensory dependent decision-making behaviors. Distinct natural isolates have been examined across a behavioral paradigm where worms are challenged with both food and danger cues and their escape and food leaving behavior will be assessed. Preliminary results suggest different strains of nematode perform multi-sensory behaviors differently. I will continue to test a variety of natural isolates for their ability to perform multi-sensory behavior and overall identify potential differences in behavioral preference across various natural isolates of nematodes.

(Key Words: C. elegans, Caenorhabditis, Behavior, Sensory-dependent, Natural Isolates, Multi-sensory, Chemosensory, Nematodes)