Presentation Title

A Closer Look at the Peruvian Healthcare System and the Patient Medical Treatment Experience

Faculty Mentor

Lia Roberts

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 63

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Peru’s healthcare system is divided into five decentralized government entities. The largest entity is the Ministry of Health (MINSA) that covers 60% of the population and addresses health coverage to rural areas where access to medical services is either limited or nonexistent. MINSA operates the Integral Social Insurance (SIS) established in 2002 that is health insurance designed to offer coverage to vulnerable population. Over a decade later, SIS does not cover all populations nor does it coverall healthcare costs. Research is divided over the most direct cause of lack of access to health care services. Some studies have argued that variations in access to preventative medicine can explained by geographic barriers, socioeconomic disparities, and lack of resources for doctors to properly diagnose illnesses. Others focus on medical mistrust. This research utilizes 99 interviews conducted in the Cusco province in 2017 and 2018 by MSMU’s Global Women in STEM and Policy program to explore the efficiency and effectiveness of MINSA as well as attitudes from indigenous communities concerning trust of the healthcare system and their medical providers. Analysis of attitudes show a correlation between the level of trust towards medical providers to the length of wait times at a health center or hospital, the amount of medical costs, and the duration patients wait before seeking medical attention. Policy analysis shows that although SIS exists to assist rural populations and the working population, it ends up costing the patient more funds. This policy analysis reveals the inefficiency of MINSA in that the health insurance system is not covering underrepresented communities Further, this study offers several possible courses of action, wherein MINSA provides more educational programs in rural populations and work to provide increases access to preventive medicine as well as bridging the gap seen among patient-provider relationships.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

A Closer Look at the Peruvian Healthcare System and the Patient Medical Treatment Experience

CREVELING 63

Peru’s healthcare system is divided into five decentralized government entities. The largest entity is the Ministry of Health (MINSA) that covers 60% of the population and addresses health coverage to rural areas where access to medical services is either limited or nonexistent. MINSA operates the Integral Social Insurance (SIS) established in 2002 that is health insurance designed to offer coverage to vulnerable population. Over a decade later, SIS does not cover all populations nor does it coverall healthcare costs. Research is divided over the most direct cause of lack of access to health care services. Some studies have argued that variations in access to preventative medicine can explained by geographic barriers, socioeconomic disparities, and lack of resources for doctors to properly diagnose illnesses. Others focus on medical mistrust. This research utilizes 99 interviews conducted in the Cusco province in 2017 and 2018 by MSMU’s Global Women in STEM and Policy program to explore the efficiency and effectiveness of MINSA as well as attitudes from indigenous communities concerning trust of the healthcare system and their medical providers. Analysis of attitudes show a correlation between the level of trust towards medical providers to the length of wait times at a health center or hospital, the amount of medical costs, and the duration patients wait before seeking medical attention. Policy analysis shows that although SIS exists to assist rural populations and the working population, it ends up costing the patient more funds. This policy analysis reveals the inefficiency of MINSA in that the health insurance system is not covering underrepresented communities Further, this study offers several possible courses of action, wherein MINSA provides more educational programs in rural populations and work to provide increases access to preventive medicine as well as bridging the gap seen among patient-provider relationships.