Presentation Title

Effects of Prolonged Wait Time on Willingness to Seek Preventative Care

Faculty Mentor

Lia Roberts

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 64

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In 2017, a cross-sectional public health survey conducted in Hong Kong showed that prolonged wait time in clinics and emergency rooms resulted in reduced patient satisfaction and decreased willingness to return. While many studies show the relationship between patient satisfaction with prolonged wait times, the relationship between prolonged wait times and decreased willingness to return is less studied. One study conducted in North Carolina at the Wake Forest University Medical Center, however, does show that,“increased waits resulted in reduced patient satisfaction and decreased willingness to return.” In Peru, a majority of hospitals and clinics that have surgery capabilities only truly exist in the major cities of Lima, Cusco, Arequipa, and Trujillo. For those living in the rural areas of Peru, this means a long journey to seek medical attention, missing work which is detrimental on those who cannot afford to miss a day of work. This study will examine the Peruvian Andes and the effect that wait times in healthcare institutions have on seeking medical care when presented with symptoms. Through a qualitative and quantitative analysis of pooled data collected by MSMU’s GW STEM Cohorts 1 & 2 in two years (2017 and 2018) from the Cusco province of Peru, this study demonstrates that prolonged wait times in Peruvian healthcare institutions have an effect on patients seeking medical care. Many patients waited a range of days to years before seeking medical care due to the fact that it can take as little as one hour to as long as weeks before they can be seen. This is consequential as those who may be suffering from a severe illness or disease do not necessarily have a lot of time to wait to be treated. Conducting this research opens one eyes to some of the failures of the Peruvian healthcare system.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Effects of Prolonged Wait Time on Willingness to Seek Preventative Care

CREVELING 64

In 2017, a cross-sectional public health survey conducted in Hong Kong showed that prolonged wait time in clinics and emergency rooms resulted in reduced patient satisfaction and decreased willingness to return. While many studies show the relationship between patient satisfaction with prolonged wait times, the relationship between prolonged wait times and decreased willingness to return is less studied. One study conducted in North Carolina at the Wake Forest University Medical Center, however, does show that,“increased waits resulted in reduced patient satisfaction and decreased willingness to return.” In Peru, a majority of hospitals and clinics that have surgery capabilities only truly exist in the major cities of Lima, Cusco, Arequipa, and Trujillo. For those living in the rural areas of Peru, this means a long journey to seek medical attention, missing work which is detrimental on those who cannot afford to miss a day of work. This study will examine the Peruvian Andes and the effect that wait times in healthcare institutions have on seeking medical care when presented with symptoms. Through a qualitative and quantitative analysis of pooled data collected by MSMU’s GW STEM Cohorts 1 & 2 in two years (2017 and 2018) from the Cusco province of Peru, this study demonstrates that prolonged wait times in Peruvian healthcare institutions have an effect on patients seeking medical care. Many patients waited a range of days to years before seeking medical care due to the fact that it can take as little as one hour to as long as weeks before they can be seen. This is consequential as those who may be suffering from a severe illness or disease do not necessarily have a lot of time to wait to be treated. Conducting this research opens one eyes to some of the failures of the Peruvian healthcare system.