Presentation Title

Performance of Two Spanish-speaking Samples and an English-speaking Sample on the Cordoba Naming Test

Faculty Mentor

David Hardy, Alberto L. Fernandez

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 67

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Neuropsychological assessment can be useful in detecting possible brain damage; a major domain measured is language. One type of language test, so-called confrontation naming tests, requires speaking the name of a series of pictures of objects. In the United States, these tests are usually developed for native English speakers. It is also common for these confrontation naming tests to be translated to other languages; However, the translation process can produce cultural and linguistic nuances which impede an accurate assessment of Spanish-speakers. For example, in the Boston Naming Test, multiple items do not have equivalent terms in Spanish (e.g., pretzel) or are quite unfamiliar for specific areas of Spanish-speaking populations (e.g., igloo). As a result, these tests begin to measure Spanish-speakers’ general knowledge instead of naming abilities. The Córdoba Naming Test (CNT), developed in Argentina, was created to address the obstacles found in the translated confrontation naming tests for Spanish-speakers. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of three populations: US Spanish-speakers (N = 23), US English-speakers (N = 6), and Argentinian Spanish-speakers (N = 20). The prediction here is that the American samples (Spanish and English) will differ significantly from the Argentinian sample, but no significant differences between the American groups. Just as the Spanish-speaking sample, the English-speakers were recruited through the test administers’ personal acquaintances. The following protocol was used: subject consent, background questionnaire, health history, CNT, acculturation scale, and debriefing. For the most part, American Spanish-speakers (M = 38.61) were older than Argentine participants (M = 33.35) and English-speakers (M = 21). American Spanish-speakers (M = 13.13) and English-speakers (M = 13.67) had about the same years of education as Argentine participants (M = 13.65). Data collection is still in progress; hence no firm conclusions can be made.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Performance of Two Spanish-speaking Samples and an English-speaking Sample on the Cordoba Naming Test

CREVELING 67

Neuropsychological assessment can be useful in detecting possible brain damage; a major domain measured is language. One type of language test, so-called confrontation naming tests, requires speaking the name of a series of pictures of objects. In the United States, these tests are usually developed for native English speakers. It is also common for these confrontation naming tests to be translated to other languages; However, the translation process can produce cultural and linguistic nuances which impede an accurate assessment of Spanish-speakers. For example, in the Boston Naming Test, multiple items do not have equivalent terms in Spanish (e.g., pretzel) or are quite unfamiliar for specific areas of Spanish-speaking populations (e.g., igloo). As a result, these tests begin to measure Spanish-speakers’ general knowledge instead of naming abilities. The Córdoba Naming Test (CNT), developed in Argentina, was created to address the obstacles found in the translated confrontation naming tests for Spanish-speakers. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of three populations: US Spanish-speakers (N = 23), US English-speakers (N = 6), and Argentinian Spanish-speakers (N = 20). The prediction here is that the American samples (Spanish and English) will differ significantly from the Argentinian sample, but no significant differences between the American groups. Just as the Spanish-speaking sample, the English-speakers were recruited through the test administers’ personal acquaintances. The following protocol was used: subject consent, background questionnaire, health history, CNT, acculturation scale, and debriefing. For the most part, American Spanish-speakers (M = 38.61) were older than Argentine participants (M = 33.35) and English-speakers (M = 21). American Spanish-speakers (M = 13.13) and English-speakers (M = 13.67) had about the same years of education as Argentine participants (M = 13.65). Data collection is still in progress; hence no firm conclusions can be made.