Presentation Title

The Role of Language Brokering on Stress Among Latinx Millennial College Students

Faculty Mentor

Guadalupe A. Bacio

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 71

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Language brokers are children or adolescents of immigrant parents who become the family’s English translator and interpreter. Immigrant families to the U.S. often heavily rely on their child’s proficiency with the language and culture to navigate and function in society, which inadvertently exposes these children to taxing environments. Current literature has primarily explored the role of language brokering in both positive and adverse health outcomes for adolescents and their families. Specifically, language brokering has been found to act as a protective factor within the professional environment, particularly seen in females, against higher levels of burnout, which entails long-term adverse health outcomes, later in life. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding its impact on emerging adults in college. As such, the current study seeks to investigate the impact of language brokering on symptoms relating to burnout in this population, particularly stress. Investigators predict that aspects of language brokering will predict higher levels of stress among males, based on current literature. This is a secondary analysis consisting of 162 Latinx college students, primarily from Southern California, who participated in a larger study focused on the relationship between language brokering and health outcomes among Latinx millennials. Analyses showed that possessing negative perceptions towards language brokering predicted lower levels of stress among females, but not for males (β = -.28*, p < 0.05). Implications for these findings suggest a further in-depth examination of the varying contexts pertaining to being a language broker in relation to mental health, such as gender and cultural influences.

Summary of research results to be presented

A PROCESS macro regression model (1) showed that gender moderated the association of negative feelings towards language brokering and stress. In particular, Latinas experiencing increased negative feelings reported having lower levels of stress (β = -.28*, p < 0.05).

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Role of Language Brokering on Stress Among Latinx Millennial College Students

CREVELING 71

Language brokers are children or adolescents of immigrant parents who become the family’s English translator and interpreter. Immigrant families to the U.S. often heavily rely on their child’s proficiency with the language and culture to navigate and function in society, which inadvertently exposes these children to taxing environments. Current literature has primarily explored the role of language brokering in both positive and adverse health outcomes for adolescents and their families. Specifically, language brokering has been found to act as a protective factor within the professional environment, particularly seen in females, against higher levels of burnout, which entails long-term adverse health outcomes, later in life. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding its impact on emerging adults in college. As such, the current study seeks to investigate the impact of language brokering on symptoms relating to burnout in this population, particularly stress. Investigators predict that aspects of language brokering will predict higher levels of stress among males, based on current literature. This is a secondary analysis consisting of 162 Latinx college students, primarily from Southern California, who participated in a larger study focused on the relationship between language brokering and health outcomes among Latinx millennials. Analyses showed that possessing negative perceptions towards language brokering predicted lower levels of stress among females, but not for males (β = -.28*, p < 0.05). Implications for these findings suggest a further in-depth examination of the varying contexts pertaining to being a language broker in relation to mental health, such as gender and cultural influences.