Presentation Title

Joining the Military: Identifying the Gap Between Service Members and College Students

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Coons

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 72

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

In the most recent years, we have seen a shift in how individuals think about military service members. According to Reiss (2008), discussing military service has become off-limits to many. Young Americans are very unfamiliar with the military, its culture, its basic structure, and its function despite growing up in an age with continuous war and these young people remain skeptical about the military as an institution (Colford & Sugarman, 2016). However, for those who serve, they cite a sense of commitment and loyalty and others indicate that they join for the educational advancement they receive from serving (Griffith, 2007). The aim of this study is to examine the perceptions of college students on why they think people join the military in comparison to what service members report to determine if there is a gap in understanding and ways in which we can reduce this potential discrepancy. Preliminary results from 70 non-military students at California State University, Fullerton (81.4% female; Mage = 21.19, SD = 6.31) indicate that they believe service members join the military for a variety of reasons, however, the most commonly reported reasons were that service members were following in their families footsteps and/or service members felt a duty to join the military. Although only three service members have responded, they each reported the feeling of duty to serve as their primary reason for joining. Based on these preliminary results there seems to be some agreement but more data is needed (currently in progress) to solidify these findings and align individuals from different backgrounds and experiences.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Joining the Military: Identifying the Gap Between Service Members and College Students

CREVELING 72

In the most recent years, we have seen a shift in how individuals think about military service members. According to Reiss (2008), discussing military service has become off-limits to many. Young Americans are very unfamiliar with the military, its culture, its basic structure, and its function despite growing up in an age with continuous war and these young people remain skeptical about the military as an institution (Colford & Sugarman, 2016). However, for those who serve, they cite a sense of commitment and loyalty and others indicate that they join for the educational advancement they receive from serving (Griffith, 2007). The aim of this study is to examine the perceptions of college students on why they think people join the military in comparison to what service members report to determine if there is a gap in understanding and ways in which we can reduce this potential discrepancy. Preliminary results from 70 non-military students at California State University, Fullerton (81.4% female; Mage = 21.19, SD = 6.31) indicate that they believe service members join the military for a variety of reasons, however, the most commonly reported reasons were that service members were following in their families footsteps and/or service members felt a duty to join the military. Although only three service members have responded, they each reported the feeling of duty to serve as their primary reason for joining. Based on these preliminary results there seems to be some agreement but more data is needed (currently in progress) to solidify these findings and align individuals from different backgrounds and experiences.