Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Growth Mindset, Self-Compassion, and Resilience

Faculty Mentor

Barbara Thayer

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 73

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

How an individual thinks about his or her intelligence and personality can either be advantageous or detrimental to their academic and personal success. Studies have shown that those who hold a growth mindset, or the belief that intelligence is malleable, are more likely to persist and maintain effort in an academic environment, and show greater achievement as a result. Growth mindset has also been shown to temper some of the negative effects of depression and anxiety. The positive effects of mindset on persistence as well as on depression and anxiety suggest a role for self-talk and self-regard. Mindset may also reflect attribution of past experiences, successes as well as failures. The current study investigates several possible correlates of growth mindset. We hypothesized that there is a relationship between growth mindset, one’s style of internal self-talk, and one’s resilience, or ability to adapt positively to adversities and setbacks. We assessed these relationships using three scales: the Implicit Theories Scale, the Self-Compassion Scale, and the Inventory of College Resilience Scale. Forty-four California State University Channel Islands students completed the three self-report measures evaluating these components along with a questionnaire to report demographic information. No significant relationship was observed between the Implicit Theories Scale and the Self-Compassion Scale or between the Implicit Theories Scale and the Inventory of College Resilience Scale. There was, however, a moderately strong positive correlation between the Self-Compassion Scale and the Inventory of College Students’ Resilience, r(41) = .651, p < .01. These findings suggest an important relationship between compassionate self-talk and one’s ability to recover from hardship. This study also supports the idea that growth mindset is independent from self-talk and resilience. These three factors may all play a role in how likely college students are to persevere in the face of challenges in succeed in completing their degree.

Key Words: Growth Mindset, Implicit Theories, self-compassion, resilience,

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Relationship Between Growth Mindset, Self-Compassion, and Resilience

CREVELING 73

How an individual thinks about his or her intelligence and personality can either be advantageous or detrimental to their academic and personal success. Studies have shown that those who hold a growth mindset, or the belief that intelligence is malleable, are more likely to persist and maintain effort in an academic environment, and show greater achievement as a result. Growth mindset has also been shown to temper some of the negative effects of depression and anxiety. The positive effects of mindset on persistence as well as on depression and anxiety suggest a role for self-talk and self-regard. Mindset may also reflect attribution of past experiences, successes as well as failures. The current study investigates several possible correlates of growth mindset. We hypothesized that there is a relationship between growth mindset, one’s style of internal self-talk, and one’s resilience, or ability to adapt positively to adversities and setbacks. We assessed these relationships using three scales: the Implicit Theories Scale, the Self-Compassion Scale, and the Inventory of College Resilience Scale. Forty-four California State University Channel Islands students completed the three self-report measures evaluating these components along with a questionnaire to report demographic information. No significant relationship was observed between the Implicit Theories Scale and the Self-Compassion Scale or between the Implicit Theories Scale and the Inventory of College Resilience Scale. There was, however, a moderately strong positive correlation between the Self-Compassion Scale and the Inventory of College Students’ Resilience, r(41) = .651, p < .01. These findings suggest an important relationship between compassionate self-talk and one’s ability to recover from hardship. This study also supports the idea that growth mindset is independent from self-talk and resilience. These three factors may all play a role in how likely college students are to persevere in the face of challenges in succeed in completing their degree.

Key Words: Growth Mindset, Implicit Theories, self-compassion, resilience,