Presentation Title

Student Preference and the Effect of Text Medium on Reading Comprehension

Faculty Mentor

Barbara Thayer

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 74

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Academic textbooks are accessible to students generally in two forms, as traditional paper textbooks and as electronic textbooks (e-books). E-books are more economically friendly, environmentally friendly and more portable than paper textbooks, yet students tend to prefer paper textbooks. The preference for either textbook format may be explained by the student’s capacity to understand or remember material presented in that format. Several older studies showed no difference in reading comprehension between paper textbooks and e-books; however, technological advancements have changed e-book formats. This study examined the differences in reading comprehension among students who use paper textbooks versus e-books. In addition, this study explored students’ current textbook preference. Participants in this study were administered The Nelson Denny Practice Reading Test (NDPRT) which is comprised of a series of different passages followed by corresponding multiple choice questions. There was a total of forty-four questions in the NDPRT. Twenty-nine subjects were randomly assigned to read either a paper version of the NDPRT or an electronic version provided in a Microsoft Word document. The NDPRT was taken during one session in which participants completed the reading with no time constraint. Participants also completed a demographic questionnaire reporting their GPA, class standing, and whether they had been diagnosed with dyslexia and/or ADHD. Statistical analyses demonstrated no significant difference in reading scores between the two groups (p >.05). A chi-square test was performed to determine whether either text medium was preferred. Students significantly preferred print textbooks to e-books, χ2 (1, N = 29) = 12.448, p < .000. Text medium preference did not correlate significantly with reading scores. The results of this study suggest that despite a strong preference for traditional paper texts, students’ reading comprehension does not vary by text medium. Thus electronic textbooks are likely a viable alternative to traditional paper textbooks.

Key words: Reading comprehension, e-books, electronic books

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Student Preference and the Effect of Text Medium on Reading Comprehension

CREVELING 74

Academic textbooks are accessible to students generally in two forms, as traditional paper textbooks and as electronic textbooks (e-books). E-books are more economically friendly, environmentally friendly and more portable than paper textbooks, yet students tend to prefer paper textbooks. The preference for either textbook format may be explained by the student’s capacity to understand or remember material presented in that format. Several older studies showed no difference in reading comprehension between paper textbooks and e-books; however, technological advancements have changed e-book formats. This study examined the differences in reading comprehension among students who use paper textbooks versus e-books. In addition, this study explored students’ current textbook preference. Participants in this study were administered The Nelson Denny Practice Reading Test (NDPRT) which is comprised of a series of different passages followed by corresponding multiple choice questions. There was a total of forty-four questions in the NDPRT. Twenty-nine subjects were randomly assigned to read either a paper version of the NDPRT or an electronic version provided in a Microsoft Word document. The NDPRT was taken during one session in which participants completed the reading with no time constraint. Participants also completed a demographic questionnaire reporting their GPA, class standing, and whether they had been diagnosed with dyslexia and/or ADHD. Statistical analyses demonstrated no significant difference in reading scores between the two groups (p >.05). A chi-square test was performed to determine whether either text medium was preferred. Students significantly preferred print textbooks to e-books, χ2 (1, N = 29) = 12.448, p < .000. Text medium preference did not correlate significantly with reading scores. The results of this study suggest that despite a strong preference for traditional paper texts, students’ reading comprehension does not vary by text medium. Thus electronic textbooks are likely a viable alternative to traditional paper textbooks.

Key words: Reading comprehension, e-books, electronic books