Presentation Title

Neighborhood Health Advocates: Increasing Access to Health Services in Vulnerable Communities

Faculty Mentor

Maria Matza

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 77

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

From 2017 to 2018, a partnership with the Kaiser Community Foundation and CSUF’s Center for Health Neighborhoods conducted a questionnaire to collect health and social information from Fullerton residents in zip codes 91832 and 91833. Community leaders were recruited and trained to be community health workers (promotoras). The goal of this study was to identify awareness and use of health care and preventative services among this vulnerable community. Over the course of eight-months, 800 health assessments were collected from Spanish- speaking community members residing in low-income neighborhoods. Assessments were conducted by visiting the home of community members, attending community events, and hosting local health clinics that provided resources and services to community members. The data extracted from the assessments provided valuable information about the barriers faced by these communities in accessing health care and preventative services. Referrals to local services were given to participants of the health assessment, and later re-visited to identify if health and social service needs were met, denied, or if there were issues navigating the healthcare and social systems. Qualitative data provided valuable insight into how the community might be better served and connected to existing healthcare systems. Challenges described by this mostly immigrant and undocumented community disclosed a growing lack of trust with existing community resources because of the negative political climate and the fear of deportation. These fears have materialized in a lessening attendance to health fairs and screenings, avoidance of seeking a stable medical home, and resultant emergency room use for either unwarranted health issues or medical urgency from unmanaged and exacerbated chronic illness. Further analysis of the data will be conducted to associate specific barriers to existing healthcare services with socio-economic level and educational attainment.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Neighborhood Health Advocates: Increasing Access to Health Services in Vulnerable Communities

CREVELING 77

From 2017 to 2018, a partnership with the Kaiser Community Foundation and CSUF’s Center for Health Neighborhoods conducted a questionnaire to collect health and social information from Fullerton residents in zip codes 91832 and 91833. Community leaders were recruited and trained to be community health workers (promotoras). The goal of this study was to identify awareness and use of health care and preventative services among this vulnerable community. Over the course of eight-months, 800 health assessments were collected from Spanish- speaking community members residing in low-income neighborhoods. Assessments were conducted by visiting the home of community members, attending community events, and hosting local health clinics that provided resources and services to community members. The data extracted from the assessments provided valuable information about the barriers faced by these communities in accessing health care and preventative services. Referrals to local services were given to participants of the health assessment, and later re-visited to identify if health and social service needs were met, denied, or if there were issues navigating the healthcare and social systems. Qualitative data provided valuable insight into how the community might be better served and connected to existing healthcare systems. Challenges described by this mostly immigrant and undocumented community disclosed a growing lack of trust with existing community resources because of the negative political climate and the fear of deportation. These fears have materialized in a lessening attendance to health fairs and screenings, avoidance of seeking a stable medical home, and resultant emergency room use for either unwarranted health issues or medical urgency from unmanaged and exacerbated chronic illness. Further analysis of the data will be conducted to associate specific barriers to existing healthcare services with socio-economic level and educational attainment.